Guide to Masonic "Handshakes" in the Movies Over 194 films in chronological order, updated in 2001 by Dean Grace his is a list of films containing one or more of the three most common Masonic handshakes (pressing the thumb of the right hand over the knuckle joints or between the knuckle joints on the other hand) used by certain world political leaders and certain motion picture actors and actresses viewed on various VHS tapes using the slow motion control and freeze-frame control (pause button) on a VCR. This list of films is arranged in ascending chronological order according to the year in which each film was made. Time is measured from the beginning of the Feature Presentation to the first Masonic handshake in the film. Background: The real grip of the Entered Apprentice, first degree of Freemasonry, is given by pressing the thumb of the right hand over the forefinger knuckle joint (where it meets the hand) on the other person's hand. The real Fellow Craft, a.k.a., Fellowship grip of the second degree of Freemasonry, is given by pressing the thumb of the right hand over the knuckle joint (where it meets the hand) of the second finger (middle finger). The "pass grip" of the Master Mason, the third degree of Freemasonry, is given by pressing the thumb between the knuckle joints of the second (middle) and third (ring) fingers. The "pass grip" of the Master Mason is different from the "Lion's grip" of the Master Mason that is used inside the lodge to raise a person to Master Mason status. The Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and the "pass grip" of the Master Mason are the most common Masonic handshakes used outside of the Masonic lodge. Because of the quick nature of "handshaking" and differences in the sizes of people's hands any handshake where the outstretched thumb (or cocked-thumb) presses the first knuckle, the middle knuckle, or the joint between the middle finger knuckle and third finger knuckle on the other hand is a Masonic handshake recognizable by Freemasons around the world. Freemasons swear an oath to always conceal and never reveal the secrets of Freemasonry. I am not bound by that restriction. List The Birth of a Nation, © 1915 David W. Griffith Corporation. (202 minute silent film with captions). After the caption: The visit of the Stoneman boys to their Southern friends, Mae Marsh as "Flora Cameron (the pet sister)" gives a Masonic handshake to the Stoneman boy with a mustache. After the caption: In the slave quarters, Henry Walthall as "Ben Cameron" receives a Masonic handshake from the "black slave." After the caption: The chums promise to meet again, young Cameron "chum" gives young Stoneman "chum" a Masonic handshake. After the caption: Young Stoneman vows the old vow that his only dreams shall be of her till they meet again, there is a flurry of clear Masonic handshakes in the farewell scene. Siegfried, (1924 silent film by Fritz Lang), UFA Productions. The heroic Teutonic knight Siegfried wants to marry the fair Kriemhild, sister of King Gunther. But first Siegfried must help King Gunther marry the shrew Brunhilde. Fifty minutes into the film and after the caption: "Keep your word, King Gunther, as I have kept mine!" King Gunther gives a left handed Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip to Kriemhild at the same time Siegfried gives King Gunther a clear right handed Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. The Gold Rush, (1925 silent film by Charles Chaplin). Forty-two minutes into the film dance hall girl "Georgia" played by Georgia Hale visits the cabin of "The Lone Prospector" played by Charles Chaplin. As Georgia leaves the cabin she gives Chaplin a handshake that is at first not Masonic then she curls her thumb and gives Chaplin an Entered Apprentice Masonic handgrip and then a firm Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. Eleven minutes later "Big Jim" played by Mack Swain enters the recorder's office and gives the assayer a perfect Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. 1 T Metropolis, (1926 silent film by Fritz Lang). About thirty-eight minutes into the film after the subtitles: "Rotwang, give your robot this girl's likeness. Hide the girl in your house while the robot directs my will over the workers," Rudolf Klein Rogge as "Rotwang" gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to "Joh Frederson" the master of Metropolis. Flesh and the Devil, © 1927 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corporation. John Gilbert as the dashing nobleman "Leo von Harden" has a passionate love affair with the married "Felicitas" played by Greta Garbo. Leo kills Felicitas' husband in a duel. Leo's best friend "Urich," played by Lars Hanson, is told that the duel was over a gambling argument. About fifty-five minutes into the film after returning home from army duty Leo discovers that while he was away Urich has married Felicitas. After Urich says in the silent film captions: "She has freely forgiven you for that tragic duel." "When you know Felicitas better, you will love her, too." Urich gives Leo a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. Anna Christie, © 1930 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Six minutes into the film inside the waterfront bar Lee Phelps as "Larry the bartender" receives an Entered Apprentice Masonic handshake from George F. Marion as "Chris" Anna Christie's inebriated father in the mens only partition of the bar room. Seven minutes later Marie Dressier as the inebriated "Marthy" gives Chris a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip over the bar room table seconds after she says, "You was always square with me." Freemasons are instructed to always be "on the square" and "on the level" with fellow Freemasons. Animal Crackers, © 1930 Paramount Publix Corp. Watch the Marx Brothers and Margaret Dumont give and receive Masonic handshakes. Dracula, © 1931 Universal Pictures Corp. Thirty-three minutes into the film Dr. Van Helsing meets the vampire possessed Renfield. Dr. Van Helsing says, "I am here to help you, you understand that, do you not9 " Renfield played by Dwight Frye says, "Why, of course, and I'm very grateful." Renfield gives Van Helsing a Fellow Craft Masonic Handshake. Night Nurse, © 1931 Warner Bros., Inc., & the Vitaphone Corp. Barbara Stanwyck as "Miss Hart" applies for a job at a hospital. Six minutes into the film the newly hired "nurse Hart" gives a clear Entered Apprentice Masonic handshake to her future nursing buddy "nurse Maloney" played by Joan Blondell. Fourteen minutes later after "nurse Hart" treats a bullet wound in a bootlegger's arm and doesn't report it to the police, the bootlegger appears to give her a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Twenty-three Minutes later nurse Hart gives Mrs. Ritchey, her decadent new employer, a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Two minutes later nurse Hart runs into the bootlegger at the soda shop and the Masonic phrase "on the level" is used four times in their brief conversation. Horse Feathers, © 1932 Paramount Publix Corp. I count eight Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes that the Marx Brothers give and receive in this film, mostly to and from Groucho Marx. Sons of the Desert, The Nostalgia Merchant. (Originally produced in 1932.) At the beginning of the film Laurel and Hardy wearing fezzes attend a Sons of the Desert lodge meeting. The speaker at the podium in Arab costume says, "We will now take the oath" and bangs a gavel. The speaker then says, "And remember, once taken this oath has never been broken by any man down through the centuries of time in the history of this fraternal organization . . ." And then the speaker says, "Place yourself in the position to receive the oath." Everyone crosses their arms and joins hands with their neighbors. Oliver Hardy's left hand gives Stan Laurel's right hand a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. 2 Duck Soup, © 1933 Paramount Productions, Inc. At the beginning of the film inside the Freedonia reception hall Louis Calhern as "Ambassador Trentino" receives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from Margaret Dumont as "Mrs. Teasdale." A little later Mrs. Teasdale gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Groucho Marx as "Rufus Firefly." Much later as Groucho is saying, "Mrs. Teasdale you did a noble deed," Mrs. Teasdale gives Groucho a perfect close-up Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Flying Down to Rio, © 1933 RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. Thirteen minutes into the film Blanche Friderici as the protective "Aunt Tatia" gives Gene Raymond as the gigolo "Roger Bond" a clear unmistakable Master Mason's handgrip after Bond dances with Aunt Tatia's niece played by Delores Del Rio. Aunt Tatia presses paper money into his palm while shaking hands as she says, "My niece thanks you for your politeness young man. She will not require anymore of your services this afternoon." King Kong, 1933 Radio Pictures. At the very beginning Sam Hardy as "Mr. Weston" the theatrical agent appears to give a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Frank Reicher as "Capt. Englehorn" the ship's skipper inside the ship's cabin. Little Women, © 1933 RKO Radio Pictures, LTD. At the very beginning of the film in the first scene at the United States Christian Commission, Spring Byington as "Mrs. Marmee March" gives an old man a coat and some paper money. The old man gives her a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake as she hands him the money. Later Henry Stephenson as "Grandfather Laurence" gives Katharine Hepburn as "Jo March" a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake when they meet in Mr. Laurence's home. She Done Him Wrong, © 1933 Paramount Productions, Inc. Renewed 1960 EMKA Ltd. Ten minutes into the film Mae West as "Lady Lou" walks into a saloon and gives one of her promising future paramours, Gilbert Roland as "Serge Stanieff," a clear entered apprentice Masonic handgrip. Serge kisses Lady Lou's right hand as Lou says to her other male friend, "Oh, take a look at this Gus and learn something." The Son of Kong, © 1933 RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. About twenty minutes into the film inside a Chinese bar, bad guy John Marston as "Capt. Helstrom," the man who supplied the map of Kong's island, receives an Entered Apprentice Mason's handshake from Frank Reicher as "Capt. Englehorn" who sits at a table with Robert Armstrong as "Carl Denham" the man who used Helstrom's map to capture Kong. In the original King Kong Denham and Capt. Englehorn then brought King Kong to New York City. Triumph of the Will, 1933 German propaganda film. In the "new colors are dedicated" scene Hitler appears to receive two Masonic handshakes in this serious handshaking ceremony. Treasure Island, © 1934 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp. At the film's beginning Otto Kruger as "Dr. Livesy" and Dorothy Peterson as "Mrs. Hawkins" exchange discreet Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes inside the inn. A Night at the Opera, © 1935 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp. Groucho Marx as "Otis B. Driftwood" gives Chico Marx as "Fiorello" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake as they discuss a contract after "Lassparri" is knocked out. Later Groucho gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Allan Jones as "Carlo Baroni, a.k.a. Ricurdo" after Chico and Baroni come out of the steamer trunk inside Groucho's small cabin aboard ship. There are other Masonic handshakes in this movie. A Tale of Two Cities, © 1935 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp. Twenty-one minutes into the film after landing on the coast of England at night, Donald Woods as the French nobleman "Charles Darnay" accepts an invitation for supper on Sunday from "Dr. Manette's" daughter. Darnay gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Claude Gillingwater as the English banker "Jurvis Lorry" as Lorry says, "Goodbye young man until Sunday." 3 David Copperfield, © 1935 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp. Sixty-seven minutes into the film Freddie Bartholomew as "David (the child) Copperfield" gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Roland Young as "Uriah Heep" downstairs in the home of "Mr. Wickfield" the solicitor. The 39 Steps, (Made in 1935) A Gaumont-British Picture. Robert Donat as "Richard Hannay" is falsely accused of murdering a spy. Thirty-nine minutes into the film, after "Hannay" is pursued across Scotland by police and spies alike to the estate of the nefarious "Professor Jordan," "Hannay" is introduced to the professor's daughter "Patricia" who wears eyeglasses. "Hannay" gives "Patricia" a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. The Bride of Frankenstein, © 1935 Universal Pictures Corp. About thirty-five minutes into the film Boris Karloff as "The Monster" arrives at the forest cabin of the violin playing "Blind Hermit" played by OP. Heggie. Standing in the doorway inside the cabin the Blind Hermit says to The Monster, "What's the matter?" The Blind Hermit then takes his left hand and feels The Monster's left arm and hand. The Blind Hermit says, "Your hurt my poor friend, come." The Blind Hermit gives The Monster a left-handed Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. The camera angle quickly changes and the Blind Hermit's right hand then leads The Monster into the cabin. About four minutes later the Blind Hermit gives The Monster bread and wine as they sit at the dinner table. The Hermit says, "We are friends you and I." They exchange a handshake over the table that is not Masonic while saying, "Good, good." They both smoke a cigar. The Hermit says, "Before you came I was all alone. It is bad to be alone." The Monster says, "Alone bad, friend good! Friend good!!!" The Monster then gives the Hermit a cocked-thumb Masonic handshake over the table. I would not have believed this if I hadn't seen it in freeze-frame with my own eyes. San Francisco, © 1936 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corporation. Twenty minutes into the film at "Blackie Norton's" private nightclub table Jack Holt as "Jack Burley" gives Clark Gable as "Blackie Norton" a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Then Al Shean as "the Professor, the nightclub's piano player," out of excitement, gives two clear close-up Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes in a row to William Ricciardi as opera conductor "Signor Baldini" at the table. There are more Masonic handshakes in this movie. The Charge of the Light Brigade, © 1936 Warner Bros. Pictures Inc., and Vitaphone Corp. About six minutes into the film Errol Flynn as British "Major Vickers" gives a Master Mason's handshake to C. Henry Gordon as Indian chieftain "Surat Khan." Part of Flynn's hand is concealed by the plume of his helmet that he holds in his left arm. About six minutes later Khan gives Vickers a clear Entered Apprentice Mason's handshake for saving his life. The camera zooms in for a close-up on this Masonic handgrip. Masonic handshakes between Vickers, Kahn, and others happen throughout the film. The Secret Agent, (Made in 1936) Gaumont British Picture Corp., LTD. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. (Based on the novel Ashenden by W. Somerset Maugham.) At the very beginning of the movie the undertaker whose left arm is missing gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip to the first of three women who leave the funeral reception room. Thirty minutes later in the gambling casino Peter Marmont as "Caypor" gives Madeleine Carroll as British espionage agent "Elsa" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake as they are introduced. Twelve minutes later after Peter Lorre as "the General" kills "Caypor" on a mountain climb, "the General" in the chalet at the bottom of the mountain gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip to "Elsa" and then receives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from John Gielgud as British espionage agent "Dick Ashenden." At the very end of the film Charles Carson as British Intelligence Chief "R" shakes hands with four military officers. Two of the officers can be seen giving "R" Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes. Lost Horizon, © 1937, renewed 1965 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. About one hour and forty two minutes into the film as measured from the film's opening title, Edward Everett Horton as "lovy" says to his friends who have decided to stay at Shangri-La in Tibet, "I've just finished translating one of the most interesting 4 old tablets you can imagine, told me all about the origins of the Masonic symbols . . . " Twenty five minutes later, at the movie's end, in the St. George Club in London, British agent "Lord Gainsford," who pursued Ronald Coleman as British soldier and diplomat "Robert Conway" on Conway's crazed quest to return to Shangri-La says, "I trailed him to the most extreme outpost of Tibet. Of course he'd already gone. But his memory will live with those natives for the rest of their lives. 'The man who was not human' they called him. They'll never forget the deviled-eyed stranger who six times tried to go over the mountain pass that no other human being dared to travel, and six times was forced to go back by the severest storms. They'll never forget the madman who stole their food and clothing, who they locked up in their barracks, but who fought six of their guards to escape." That makes three audible sixes (666) in a very short breath of time in a 1937 Hollywood movie. The numbers "666," both audible and visually, are subliminally imbedded in various Hollywood movies. You Can't Take It With You, © 1938 Columbia Pictures Corp. About fifteen minutes into the film Lionel Barrymore as "Martin Vanderhof" while sitting in the front room of his home says, "Mr. Poppins, ah this is Mr. Sycamore, my son-in-law." Donald Meek as "Mr. Poppins" gives the pipe smoking "Mr. Sycamore" a perfect center screen Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. Immediately Barrymore then says, "Mr. Poppins, Mr. DePinna." "Mr. Depinna" played by Halliwell Hobbes gives "Mr. Poppins" a perfect center screen Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. There are more clear Fellow Craft Masonic hand grips in the party scene at the end of the movie. Beau Geste, © 1939 Paramount Pictures, Inc. About forty minutes into the film after Ray Milland as "John Geste" meets his two brothers in the French Foreign Legion barracks, Charles Barton as the short new recruit "Mr. McMonigal" gives Robert Preston as "Dirk Geste" a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Destry Rides Again, © 1939 Universal Pictures Co., Inc. About ten minutes into the film the honest sheriff of the City of Bottleneck is killed inside the Bloody Gulch Saloon. Marlene Dietrich as the saloon girl "Frenchy" then sings a song to the crowd's immense enjoyment. The villain (Brian Donlevy) stands on the bar's stage and quiets the crowd. The town's mayor then says, "... I do hereby appoint for the post of sheriff that paragon of courage, that credit to his community, the pride of Bottleneck, Mr. Washington Dimsdale." "Washington (Wash) Dimsdale" is played by Charles Winninger. "Frenchy" then throws a drink into "Wash's" face who is passed out on the floor. The crowd cheers. "Wash" sits up on the bar and asks, "What are we cheering for?" "Frenchy" says, "It's for you Wash, you're the new sheriff." Brian Donlevy then gives "Wash" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. "Wash" then swears off liquor and sends for "Destry" to help restore law and order. About ten minutes later the stage coach arrives in town. A meek-looking "Destry" and the burly "Jack Tyndall" played by Jack Carson get off. "Jack" immediately knocks the stage coach driver out because of the rough ride. "Wash" mistakenly thinks that tough guy "Jack" is "Destry." "Wash" welcomes "Jack." "Jack" gives "Wash" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Gone With The Wind, © 1939 Selznick International Pictures, Inc. Eighteen minutes into the film, as measured from the beginning of the opening overture, Vivien Leigh as "Scarlett O'Hara" steps out of a carriage on a social visit to the Wilkes' Twelve Oaks plantation and receives a clear center screen Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from Alicia Rhett as "India Wilkes." Twenty-one minutes later at the bazaar in Atlanta Olivia de Havilland as "Mrs. Ashley Wilkes" gives Clark Gable as "Rhett Butler" a clear Master Mason's handgrip. Idiot's Delight, © 1939 Loew's, Inc. Thirty minutes into the film as Clark Gable and his troupe of chorus girls arrive at the posh Alpine Inn, Clark Gable as "Harry" gives Skeets Gallagher as "Don Navadel" the social manager of the inn a fast Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. The Little Princess, © 1939 Twentieth Century-Fox Corp. About seventeen minutes into the film Shirley Temple as "Sarah, the little princess" gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Richard Greene as "Mr. Goeffrey Hamilton" her new horse riding instructor at the boarding house. 5 Foreign Correspondent, © 1940 Walter Wanger Productions, Inc. Joel McCrea is an American news reporter in London at the beginning World War II. Sixteen minutes into the film at a diplomatic cocktail party McCrea shakes hands with Herbert Marshall as "Stephen Fisher." The handshake is not Masonic but then McCrea takes his left hand out of his pocket and gives Marshall a very quick and truly esoteric Mark Master Mason's handgrip. "Mark Master Mason" is the beginning of Royal Arch Freemasonry in the York Rite. The two men look like pillars that appear to support a Royal Arch window in the background over their heads. Moments later McCrea gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip to the smiling "Latvian" who wears white gloves. Thirty minutes later McCrea, while standing in his pajamas in a hotel room and talking to Laraine Day, gives the Latvian another Fellow Craft Masonic Handshake at the room's doorway. The Grapes of Wrath, © 1940 Twentieth Century Fox. About twenty-five minutes into the film Henry Fonda as "Tom Joad" greets Jane Darwell as "Ma Joad" with a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake when "Tom" returns from prison. Road to Zanzibar, © 1941 Paramount Pictures, Inc. About fifteen minutes into the film Bing Crosby as "Chuck" and Bob Hope as "Fearless" drink champagne in a South African nightclub. The police come into the nightclub looking for two Americans (Chuck and Fearless) who burned down a carnival. To escape the police "Chuck" and "Fearless" go up on the nightclub's stage and dance with the show girls. As an encore "Chuck" and "Fearless" give their impression of two orchestra leaders meeting on the boulevard. At center stage Bing Crosby as "Chuck" gives Bob Hope as "Fearless" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. Sergeant York, © 1941 Warner Bros. Seven minutes into the film "Luke" the U.S. mail carrier gives "Zeke" a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake inside Rosier Pile's General Merchandise store. Thirty-eight minutes later Gary Cooper as "Alvin York" gives "Mr. Tompkins" a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake for extending the time for a land sale. Five minutes later Alvin York gives Walter Brennan as "Pastor Rosier Pile" a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake after Pastor Pile declares York the winner in a shooting contest. The Great Lie, © 1941 Warner Bros. Pictures. About forty minutes into the film Lucile Watson as "Mrs. Greenfield, a.k.a., Aunt Ada" gives "Colonel Harriston" a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake in the study of her mansion house just before she is told that Peter Van Allen's airplane is missing over the jungles of Brazil. Mrs. Miniver, © 1942 Loew's Inc. About forty minutes into the film Rhys Williams as "Horace" gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Walter Pidgeon as "Clem Miniver" in "Miniver's" dining room just before "Horace" leaves for the war front. Much later near the film's end Dame May Whitty as "Lady Beldon" gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Henry Travers as "Mr. Ballard" at the awards table on the stage while "Mr. Ballard" accepts the trophy for winning first place in the flower contest for the best rose. Girl Crazy, © 1943 Loew's Inc. Mickey Rooney as rich kid "Danny Churchill, Jr." who has a taste for wine, women, and song is sent to an all-male college by his father. The college is about to be closed and only the State Governor who is a political friend of "Danny's" father can help. Sixty-six minutes into the film, after "Danny" has given six handshakes during the movie that were not Masonic, "Danny" and Judy Garland go to the Governor's office to save the school. Moments after "Danny" puts on an amazing display of verbal linguistics to cheer-up Judy Garland an almost speechless "Danny," who is awed by the Governor's presence, gives Howard Freeman as "Governor Tait" a clear Entered Apprentice Masonic handshake. Yankee Doodle Dandy, © 1943 Warner Bros. Pictures Inc. About five minutes into the film James Cagney as "George M. Cohan" receives a perfect center screen Master Mason's handshake from Capt. Jack Young as "President Franklin D. Roosevelt" across the President's desk inside the Oval Office. It just doesn't get much better than this. 6 Going My Way, © 1944 Paramount Pictures Inc. About fifteen minutes into the film in the courtyard of St. Dominic's parish Bing Crosby as "Father O'Malley" introduces two Catholic priests to each other. Crosby says, "Father Fitzgibbon, this is my old friend Father O'Dell." The light-hearted "Fr. O'Dell" cheerfully extends his right hand and receives a feeble Master Mason's handshake from Barry Fitzgerald as the melancholy "Fr. Fitzgibbon." Meet Me In St Louis, © 1944 Loew's Inc. About one hour and twenty minutes into the film Judy Garland and her "Grandpa" go to the big dance. "Warren" and June Lockhart as "Lucille" enter the ballroom. "Lucille" gives "Grandpa" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip as they are introduced. The Keys of the Kingdom, © 1944 Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. About fourteen minutes into the film at the railroad station just before he leaves for Catholic Holywell College Gregory Peck as "Francis Chisholm" gives "Willie" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Fifteen minutes later as "Father Francis" played by Gregory Peck volunteers for missionary work in China, he gives his old fishing buddy who has recently become "the new Bishop" played By Edmund Gwenn a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. One hour and twenty-one minutes later "Fr. Francis" gives Vincent Price as "Father Angus" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake as "Fr. Angus" leaves China. Twenty minutes later upon leaving his mission station in rural China to return to Scotland an aged "Fr. Francis" gives his old Chinese friend a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. "Fr. Francis" then gives his young Chinese friend a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Four minutes later back in Scotland Sir Cedric Hardwicke as "Monsignor" says, "It is an honor to have known you Father" as he gives Fr. Francis a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Moments later before he steps into an automobile Monsignor says, "There is nothing I will say to the Bishop that in anyway will alter your position here or your hopes for the future." Fr. Francis says, "Thank you." Monsignor says, "Thank you Father Chisholm" as he gives him another clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. The Corn Is Green, © 1945 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Three minutes into the film "Miss Ronberry" gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to "Squire Cheggerby" as the meet inside the Welsh cottage. Deception, © 1946 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Twenty-three minutes into the film Claude Rains as music maestro "Alexander Hollenius" gives Paul Henreid as the cello playing "Karel Novak" a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake when they first meet at the wedding reception party for "Karel" and his new bride "Christine" played by Bette Davis. It's a Wonderful Life, © 1946 Liberty Films, Inc. About thirty minutes into the film James Stewart as "George Bailey" gives a clear Entered Apprentice Mason's handshake to Lionel Barrymore as the bad guy financier "Mr. Potter" in Potter's office over his desk when Potter tries to hire Bailey. Bailey looks at his hand in disgust and decides not to work for Potter. Road to Utopia, © 1946 Paramount Pictures, Inc. In this film Bob Hope is "Chester" and Bing Crosby is "Duke." About one hour and twenty minutes into the film Chester and Duke walk into the Alaskan Golden Rail Saloon owned by "Ace Larson." While Ace, Chester, and Duke stand at the bar Ace suspects that they are the notorious bad guys called "Sperry and M'Gerk" who when caught are to be hanged. Ace says to Chester and Duke, "We'll know em when we see em, you see they always travel with a big shaggy dog." Chester and Duke laugh off any connection with the bad guys. Ace then says, "The minute we see that dog we're going to string em up." Then a big shaggy dog walks into the saloon, walks up next to Chester, eats part of Chester's sandwich (all unseen by Ace Larson), and starts barking. Chester then starts barking. Duke says to Ace, "He thinks he's a dog. His mother was frightened by a Pekinese." Duke says to Chester, "That's alright Rover. That's a good fellow. Gemme your paw Rov, gemme your paw." Chester (Bob Hope) gives Duke (Bing Crosby) a clear center screen Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. 7 Copacahana, © 1947 Republic Pictures Corp. Halfway through the film and immediately after "Mr. Liggett" the theatrical agent buys Fifi's contract for five thousand dollars from Groucho Marx as "Devereaux" her agent, Devereaux gives Liggett a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Johnny Belinda. © 1948 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. About forty-five minutes into the film Lew Ayres as "Robert Richardson" the village's doctor takes Belinda into town for a medical examination by a specialist. After the examination the specialist informs Richardson that Belinda's disability will not affect her pregnancy. The specialist standing in his office says, "I'll be interested in following the case with you." Richardson says, "I'd be very grateful" as he gives the specialist a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. State of the Union, © 1948 Liberty Films, Inc. Spencer Tracy as "Grant Mathews" is the idealistic industrialist who runs for the Presidency. About one hour and twenty-five minutes into the film Mathews and his campaign manager meet "Congressman Lauterback" in a cab in Washington, D.C. After the political deal is made Congressman Lauterback gives Mathews a soft Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. Instantly Mathews realizes that his political idealism has ended. There are other Masonic handgrips in this film. Treasure of the Sierra Madre, © 1948 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. In this movie's final scene at the very end, Walter Huston as "Howard" says farewell to "Curtin" his young prospecting buddy played by Tim Holt. Both are on horseback and "Curtin's" right arm is in a sling. Walter Huston's right hand gives Tim Holt's left hand a Master Mason's handgrip, seen in freeze-frame, as they depart. All The King's Men, © 1949 Columbia Pictures Corporation. About thirty-nine minutes into the film after Broderick Crawford as politician "Willie Stark" learns how to win political campaigns there is a scene where bank checks and paper currency drift across the screen. Then two hands in an overhead full screen close-up shake each other with perfect Fellow Craft Masonic hand grips. The Fountainhead, © 1949 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Forty-five minutes into the film Gary Cooper as the architect "Howard Roark" gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to the millionaire building contractor "Roger Enright" at the party to celebrate the opening of Enright House. The Heiress, © 1949 Paramount Pictures, Inc. Fifty-three minutes into the film Montgomery Gift as the dashing fortune hunter "Mr. Townsend" gives Sir Ralph Richardson as the rich "Dr. Sloper" a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake in the Dr.'s parlor when Townsend comes over to ask to marry the Dr.'s wealthy spinster daughter, his only heir. Broken Arrow, © 1950 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp. About thirty minutes into the film Debra Paget as the Apache Indian called "White Painted Lady" gives James Stewart as "Tom Jeffords" an Entered Apprentice Mason's handgrip inside a tepee. About fifty minutes later at the Indian marriage ceremony for Stewart and Paget, the medicine man ties Paget's left hand to Stewart's right hand with a cord. Stewart clearly presses his thumb directly over Paget's middle knuckle. And "Tom Jeffords" and the "White Painted Lady" are united in marriage with a binding Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. Kim, © 1950 Loew's Inc. Twenty minutes into the film Cecil Kellaway as British secret agent "Chunder," disguised as a native of India, gives a clear center screen Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Robert Douglas as "Colonel Creighton," chief of the British Secret Intelligence Service in India. Thirty-one minutes later Dean Stockwell as "Kim" gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to "Dr. Bronson" the headmaster of the boys' school. Seconds later Kim then receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip from a boy across the dinner table. 8 The Day The Earth Stood Still, © 1951 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. About twentyeight minutes into the film Michael Rennie as the space traveler "Klaatu" receives a clear 2nd degree Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from Patricia Neal's boyfriend "Tom Stevens" inside the boarding house. The Miracle of Our Lady of Fatima, © 1952 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. About twenty-five minutes into the film inside the Catholic church, a kneeling priest wearing a gold gilded garment and black hat rises from prayer and turns to receive a black robbed women called "Serora Carara" (sp?) who works for the church. The woman bows and kisses the priest's hand and then clearly gives him a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip before she says, " . . I couldn't miss St. Anthony's feast day. Besides I'm taking my crippled son to the cova. I'm sure Our Lady will be there again today." 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, © 1954 Walt Disney Productions. Kirk Douglas and Peter Lorre are shipwrecked survivors who have been taken captive aboard the Nautilus submarine by Captain Nemo. About one hour and twenty minutes into the film the Nautilus runs aground off the coast of New Guinea. Douglas and Lorre go ashore to collect specimens. Once on land Douglas decides to escape into the jungle but Lorre decides to return to the Nautilus. As they part ways, Kirk Douglas gives Peter Lorre a quick Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Them, © 1954 Warner Bros. Pictures Inc. About twenty minutes into the film after Edmund Gwenn as giant ant expert "Dr. Medford" arrives at the airport on a military airplane James Arness as "F.B.I. agent Robert Graham" appears to give the "Dr." a Master Mason's handshake then James Whitmore as "patrolman Ben Peterson" gives the "Dr." a perfectly clear Master Mason's handshake. White Christmas, © 1954 Paramount Pictures Corp. One hour and twenty-six minutes into the film at the cast party for the musical troupe Danny Kaye as "Phil" announces his wedding engagement. "Mr. Haring" who wears a brown striped suit jacket congratulates "Phil" with a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Guys and Dolls, © 1955 Samuel Goldwyn Productions, Inc. Sixty-three minutes into the film Kathryn Givney as Save-a-Soul missionary "General Cartwright" gives a clear Master Mason's handshake to Regis Toomey as the drum beating missionary "Arvide Abernathy" upon Cartwright's arrival at the mission station. Ten minutes later Frank Sinatra as "Nathan Detroit" receives a clear Master Mason's handshake from "police Lt. Brannigan" after "Detroit" finishes singing the song Adelaide, Adelaide, Ever Loving Adelaide. Love Is A Many-Splendored Thing, © 1955 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp. About thirty-two minutes into the film William Holden as "Mark Elliot" and Jennifer Jones as "Han Suyin" swim over to "Suyin's" friends who have a house across the bay in Hong Kong. Upon arrival "Elliot" receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from "Nora" the Chinese hostess. Much later in Macao, China when Elliot and Suyin visit a restaurant the proprietor a "Mr. Vicenti" gives Elliot a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake over the dinner table and suggests that they should go to a better table. Rebel Without a Cause, © 1955 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Fifty-four minutes into the film Natalie Wood as "Judy" extends her left hand and takes hold of the left hand of James Dean as "Jim Stark" and gives him a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip immediately after the over-the-cliff car crash where Judy's boyfriend dies. Wood gives Dean a left-handed Masonic grip?! The Trouble With Harry, © 1955 Alfred Hitchcock Productions, Inc. Three-quarters of the way through the film immediately after Shirley Maclaine agrees to marry John Forsythe as "Sam," Sam gives a perfectly clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Edmund Gwenn as "Captain Wyles" as the Captain says, "You're a lucky man Sammy. I think you'll both be happy." 9 Giant, © 1956 Giant Productions (two cassettes, Part I & II). After Elizabeth Taylor as "Leslie" marries Rock Hudson as "Jordan Benedict" they travel to Jordan's cattle ranch in Texas. Twenty-nine minutes into the film immediately after Leslie is told by Jordan's sister that, "I'm going to round up your neighbors. You're going to meet some folks, yes indeedee." Scene changes to an outdoor handshaking ceremony. Leslie gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to the first neighbor man she shakes hands with and Jordan gives his wife "Adrian" a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Then leslie gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to a young woman who holds the edge of her wide brimmed hat. And then Leslie gives an Entered Apprentice Mason's handshake to the next women in line. Twenty-seven minutes later at the funeral for Jordan's sister in the main room of the ranch house, Leslie with her back to the camera gives two Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes to a neighbor couple as they leave. Six minutes later at the end of the funeral and after one of Leslie's neighbors tells her that they've struck oil and are bringing in a million dollars a month, the neighbor's wife gives Leslie a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. About nineteen minutes into part two of Giant at the ranch Christmas party Dennis Hopper as "Jordan's son" receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from his future Mexican wife as she leaves the party. The Searchers, © 1956 C.V. Whitney Pictures Inc. John Wayne as ex-Confederate soldier "Ethan Edwards" returns to his brother's homestead after the Civil War. Three minutes into the film John Wayne, while holding little "Debra," walks to the dinner table where he is greeted by his young niece "Lucy." Lucy curtsies and says, "I'm mighty glad to see ya Uncle Ethan." John Wayne gives Lucy a center screen Master Mason's handshake. One hour and thirty-six minutes later Jeffory Hunter as "Marty" and his friend "Charlie" fight each other in the dirt. Ward Bond then says, "Now come on, I want you boys to shake hands and make friends." Marty gives Charlie a clear, ten-second long. Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Sayonara, © 1957 Goetz Pictures, Inc. Fourteen minutes into the film at the airport Marlon Brando as "Major Gruver" greets "General Webster" with a Masonic handshake. Forty-five minutes later "Major Gruver" gives Red Buttons as "Joe Kelly" a clear 2nd Degree Fellow Craft Masonic handshake on his first visit to Kelly's Japanese house. The Bridge on the River Kwai, © 1957 Horizon Pictures (G.B.) Ltd. One hour and sixteen minutes into the movie William Holden as American "Major Shears" greets Jack Hawkins as British "Major Warden" with a clear 2nd Degree Fellow Craft Masonic handshake when they first meet on the beach at the Mount-Lavinia Hospital, Ceylon. Belt, Book and Candle, © 1958 Phoenix Productions, Inc. About forty minutes into the film occult book writer "Sidney Redledge" played by Ernie Kovacs walks into the office of the book publisher "Sheperd (Shep) Henderson" played by James Stewart and says, "Mr. Henderson ah, I'm Sidney Redledge, you don't know me, but ah, I think I want to see you" (Sidney is under a spell cast by a witch played by Kim Novak). Sidney then gives Mr. Henderson a clear center screen Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Two minutes later Henderson's publishing partner "Andy White" walks into the office. Sidney gives Andy a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Later in the film Ernie Kovacs shakes hands with Jimmy Stewart two more times. Both are Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes. Donald in Mathmagic Land, © 1959 The Walt Disney Company (27 minute animated cartoon). At the beginning Donald Duck is transported back to ancient Greece to learn about mathematics and music. About three minutes into the film Donald Duck says, "By golly, you do find mathematics in the darndest places." Then in a hushed voice the narrator says, "They (the fraternity of eggheads called Pythagoreans) used to meet in secret to discuss their mathematical discoveries. Only members were allowed to attend (a man wearing a hood stands at the entrance to a dark cave). They had a secret emblem the pentagram (five pointed star)." Then two animated palms show the secret pentagram sign to each other. And then the two animated hands with a 10 pentagram in their palms shake each other with a handgrip that is not Masonic and the hooded man enters the cave. Donald Duck goes into the cave where the secret gathering of Pythagorean musicians are playing "slow music." Donald Duck says, "Gemme something with a beat." The ancient Grecian cartoon characters then begin to play Jazz music. About two minutes later after the music stops Donald Duck walks up to Pythagoras and says, "Pythago boy, put her there." Donald Duck gives Pythagoras a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake and a pentagram then materializes in the palm of Donald's hand. The pentagram is the symbol of the Blazing Star of Freemasonry and the Order of the Eastern Star, Freemasonry's female auxiliary. Other Masonic symbols in the cartoon are the 47th problem of Euclid, which is the Pythagorean theorem (in Masonry this is the symbolic union of man and woman that produces something greater), "the broken column" representing the jewel for "Martha" which is the fourth degree of the Eastern Star, the chess board (the tessellated floor in every Masonic lodge representing man's daily struggle on the game board of life) . . . . North By Northwest, © 1959 Loew's Incorporated. About four minutes into the film Cary Grant as "Roger Thornhill" receives a clear Entered Apprentice Mason's handgrip from a "Mr. Herman Veltner" who stands beside a table with two other gentlemen inside the hotel's cocktail lounge. The Diary Of Anne Frank, © 1959 Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation. About nine minutes into the film "Mr. Frank" receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from "Mr. Van Daan" who wears a hat and dark suit. Then "Mr. Frank" receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from "Mrs. Van Daan" played by Shelly Winters. And then Millie Perkins as "Anne Frank" receives a Master Mason's Handshake from "Mr. Van Daan." And then she receives another Master Mason's handshake from "Mrs. Van Daan." Next "Mrs. Frank" receives Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes from "Mr. Van Daan" and "Mrs. Van Daan." "Mrs. Frank" turns around and gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to the tall young man. The young girl standing behind "Mrs. Frank" gives the tall young man a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. All of the above can be seen in freeze-frame in the introductory attic scene. Exodus, © 1960 MGM-Pathe Communications Co. About six minutes into the film Eva Marie Saint as "Mrs. Freemont" gives a British officer a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip as she steps out of a taxi in front of the British embassy on the island of Cyprus. Seconds later Mrs. Freemont greets British general "Sutherland" inside the embassy gardens with a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Seven minutes later taxi driver "Ruben" gives Paul Newman as "Ari Ben Canaan" a quick, seen in freeze-frame, Fellow Craft Masonic handshake at night after Ari swims to shore. Seven minutes later in the taxi company's office Ruben gives Ari a handshake where Ruben's cocked-thumb does not quite touch Ari's middle knuckle. There are many handshakes throughout the movie. Many are cocked-thumb handshakes that do not touch the knuckle however the ones that do are patently Masonic. Ocean's 11,© 1960 Dorchester Productions, Inc. Frank Sinatra as "Danny Ocean" leads an eleven-man team of ex-82nd Airborne commandos on a robbery of Los Vegas' biggest casinos. At the end of the film they place the stolen money in the coffin of a dead friend to be shipped out of town. As Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr.. Dean Martin, Peter Lawford, and the rest of Ocean's Eleven enter the funeral parlor the camera clearly zooms in on the large Masonic All-Seeing-Eye of Providence enclosed within a radiant triangle emblazoned over the doorway. Cape Fear, © 1961 Melville-Talbot Productions. Twelve minutes into the film Gregory Peck as "Sam Boden" the small town lawyer gives Martin Balsam as "Mark Dutton" the local police chief a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake inside the chiefs garage after the chief decides to arrest the revengeful ex-con who is harassing Boden. 11 Mein Kampf, © 1961 Columbia Pictures Corp., Minerva International Films Production. About thirty-two minutes into the film a hatless high ranking German military officer wearing a grey dress uniform with a high collar gives a clear, seen in freeze-frame, Master Mason's handshake on the sidewalk before entering the Reichstag. Six minutes later Hitler appears to give a Masonic handgrip to a soldier who clearly returns a Master Mason's handshake during the scene where "new colors are dedicated by touching the so-called blood standard from the November coupe in Munich in 1923." Twenty-four minutes later after Germany attacks Poland a frightened Polish partisan wearing a grey hat and black suit clearly gives the Masonic grand hailing sign of distress. The grand hailing sign is given by raising the arms until the parts between the elbows and shoulders are perfectly horizontal then raising the rest of the arms to a vertical position; making that part of the arm below the elbow and that part above it form a square, ninety-degree angle while keeping the palms open. Seconds later a smiling German officer wearing a steel infantry helmet gives Hitler an Entered Apprentice Masonic handshake. Eighteen minutes later a German diplomat appears to give Stalin a Masonic handshake. Hitler is also filmed shaking hands with German military officers who do not give a Masonic handgrip. Pocketful of Miracles, © 1961 Franton Productions. One hour and eight minutes into the film "The Judge" gives Bette Davis as the alcoholic down-and-outer "Apple Annie" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake after Annie has been transformed into a society matron "Mrs. E. Worthington Manville." Six minutes later Glenn Ford as "Dave the Dude" gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to "Count Romero" on the dock after Annie's sheltered daughter arrives by boat from Europe. West Side Story, © 1961 MGM-Pathe Communications Co., United Artists Presentation. Sixty-one minutes into the film in the Romeo and Juliet like fire escape balcony scene Natalie Wood as "Maria" extends her right hand and says, "Good night." Richard Beymer as "Tony" gives her a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip with his left hand and says, "Good night." Dr. No, © 1962 Eon Productions, Ltd. Thirty-six minutes into the film Sean Connery as British Agent 007 "James Bond" receives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from Anthony Dawson as bad guy "Professor Dent" inside the Professor's business office. Fail-Safe, © 1964 Columbia Pictures Corporation. At the beginning of the film Walter Matthau as "professor Groeteschele" and the Washington supper party hostess discreetly exchange perfectly clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes in the morning at the end of the supper party. Four Days In November, © 1964 Wolper Productions, Inc., and United Artists Corp. About fifteen minutes into the film after President Kennedy and Jacqueline Kennedy depart the airplane in Houston, Texas they shake hands with dignitaries. Jacqueline Kennedy gives two consecutive Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes to two dark suited men standing in the line. The Unsinkable Molly Brown, © 1964 MGM Inc., and Marten Productions Inc. After Debbie Reynolds as old fashioned, down-home "Molly" and Harve Presnell as her rugged husband "Johnny" discover the richest gold mine in Colorado they take on turn-of-the-century Denver high society. One hour and eight minutes into the film after "Mr. Cartwright" the banker delivers a stack of money to the Brown's fancy home he receives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from Johnny as he leaves by the front door. Watch "Mr. Cartwright" struggle a little as he tries to free his hand from Johnny's firm Masonic handgrip. About seven minutes later Hermione Baddeley as the unpretentious "Mrs. Grogan," who is the mother of the snobbish leader of Denver's high society, drops by the Brown's house for a beer and gives Johnny an Entered Apprentice Masonic handshake. Seconds later after "Mrs. Grogan" yells "Bullsugar!" she gives Johnny a perfect Entered Apprentice Masonic handshake. Eight minutes later Molly is introduced to "Prince Louis." Molly grips the Prince's hand with a handshake that is 12 not Masonic. As the Prince tries to kiss Molly's hand Molly yells "Whoop-dee-doo" and gives the Prince a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. There are other Masonic handshakes in this film. Doctor Zhivago, © 1965 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. About one hour and thirty minutes into the film, as measured from the beginning of the opening overture, World War I is ending and the Russian revolution is beginning. Omar Sharif as "Dr. Zhivago" receives a Master Mason's handshake from a Bolshevik soldier as the soldier is leaving the makeshift army hospital. Ship of Fools, © 1965 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. At the beginning of the film dwarf Michael Dunn as "Carl Glocken" gives a quick clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Heinz Ruehmann as "Lowenthal, the Jewish businessman," over a dinner table inside the ship's dinning room. The Dirty Dozen, © 1967 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. About twenty minutes into the film Lee Marvin as "Major Reisman" is at the military prison selecting prisoners for his elite Dirty Dozen platoon. While talking to Charles Bronson as the cold-blooded "Wladislaw" inside a prison cell, Wladislaw reads a magazine called Yank. Clearly seen for five seconds over Wladislaw's left shoulder is the magazine headline: "WHAT IT MEANS TO BE A JEWISH GIRL." It seems a little out of place to me. 2001: A Space Odyssey, © 1968 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc. Twenty-six minutes into the film inside the earth orbiting space station "Dr. Floyd" from the National Council of Astronautics greets four Russian scientists. "Dr. Floyd" gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to the third women scientist wearing a purple dress with a red scarf and receives a Master Mason's handshake from the male scientist. Funny Girl, © 1968 Rastar Productions, Inc. About twenty-six minutes into the film when Omar Sharif as "Nick Arnstein" meets Barbara Streisand as "Fanny Brice" backstage at the theater, "Nick" gives "Fanny" an Entered Apprentice Masonic handgrip as he kisses her hand. M*A*S*H, © 1969 Aspen Productions, Inc. Donald Sutherland as "Hawkeye Pierce" receives a clear Entered Apprentice Mason's handshake from pretty "Lieutenant Dish," then "Hawkeye" receives a Fellow Craft Masonic grip from someone off camera, and then "Hawkeye" receives a Master Mason's handshake from "John Black, the gas-passer" all in the officer's mess tent at the beginning of the film. Patton, © 1969 Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. Thirty-three minutes into the film George C. Scott as "General Patton" gives British Air Vice-Admiral Arthur Cunningham a clear perfect "text book" Master Mason's handgrip immediately after Patton's staff meeting. Tora! Tora! Toral, © 1970 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. About one hour and twenty minutes into the film Takahiro Tamura as Japanese Air Commander pilot "Fuchida" gives his navy friend an Entered Apprentice Mason's handshake on the flight deck just before the launching of the Japanese planes for the attack on Pearl Harbor. Watch closely frame by frame at the bottom of the screen. Diamonds Are Forever, © 1971 Danjag S.A. Eight minutes into the film Sean Connery as "Commander James Bond" receives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip from Laurence Naismith as "Sir Donald" chief of British Intelligence inside Sir Donald's office. The French Connection, © 1971 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp. Ten minutes into the film Gene Hackman as police detective "Popeye Doyle" enters a nightclub followed by his partner. Gene Hackman gives the nightclub's doorkeeper, who is standing on the viewer's right, a Masonic handgrip by pressing his thumb over the man's middle knuckle. The door attendant then gives Hackman a quick Master Mason's handgrip in return. 13 The Last Picture Show, © 1971 Last Picture Show Productions, Inc. About one hour and twenty-five minutes into the film Timothy Bottoms as "Sonny" arrives in the small town driving a pick-up truck. Sonny gets out and walks over to a car where Jeff Bridges as "Duane" is resting on the front seat. Sonny gives Duane a very quick Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Cabaret, © 1972 ABC Pictures Corp., and Allied Artists Pictures Corporation. Thirty minutes into the film Liza Minnelli as "Sally" tries to seduce Michael York as "Brian" and discovers that he does not like to sleep with girls. Sally then befriends Brian by shaking his hand. Brian gives Sally a quick Entered Apprentice Mason's handgrip then moves his thumb to a more conventional handshake. Pink Flamingos, © 1972 John Waters. One hour and twenty minutes into the film female impersonator "Divine" wearing an orange dress gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip to "John Vader" from the Midnight tabloid magazine at the beginning of an interview held outdoors. The Candidate, © 1972 Warner Bros., Inc. Less than one minute into the film and before the film's title the political campaign manager, who is known later in the film as "Howard," approaches the bar and says, "Harry, how ya doin, thought you were in Philly." Harry gives Howard a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. One hour and twenty minutes later Robert Redford as the young political candidate "Bill McKay" keeps the impatient and irritated union boss "Mr. Starky" waiting for a meeting. When they finally meet, Starky gives McKay a quick Entered Apprentice Masonic handshake. The Ruling Class, © 1972 Keep Films, Ltd., made at Twickenham Studios, London, England. Peter O'Toole plays "Jack, the 14th Earl of Gurney," a paranoid schizophrenic who believes himself to be Jesus Christ. Thirty-four minutes into the film after Peter OToole, the two ladies from town, and the butler dance the Varsity Drag in the living room of the Gurney's English mansion, James Villiers as cousin "Dimsdale" gives the two ladies Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes. Thirty-nine minutes later Michael Bryant as "Dr. Herder" enters the Gurney's dining room and says, "I've come to offer my congratulations on the wedding." Sir Charles says, "Dr. Herder, this is Lady Grace Gurney." Carolyn Seymour as "Grace" rises from the table and says, "How do you do Doctor, so nice to meet you at last, you'll stay till lunch, I want to talk to you about my . . ." (crazy husband played by Peter O'Toole). Dr. Herder gives Grace a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. Fifty-nine minutes later Peter OToole in the House of Lords takes an oath of allegiance to the Queen of England, kisses the Bible, and then exchanges Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes with the seated Lord Chancellor. Twenty-five minutes from the film's beginning Lady Claire asks Jack, "How do you know your God?" Jack replies, "It's simple. When I pray to Him I find I'm talking to myself." This concept that man can reach Divinity is one of the most sublime religious beliefs of Freemasonry. Jimi Hendrix, © 1973 Warner Bros. Inc. About eight to nine minutes into this musical biographical film Jimi Hendrix appears on the Dick Cavett television show. Dick Cavett introduces him by saying in jest "Here is a naive and innocent Jimi Hendrix." Jimi Hendrix walks onto the stage and gives Dick Cavett a perfect Master Mason's handshake. Live And Let Die, © 1973 Danjaq S.A. About thirty-six minutes into the film Roger Moore as British Agent 007 "James Bond" gives Gloria Hendry as CIA agent "Rosy Carver" a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip at the doorway to the bedroom inside the hotel room. Daisy Miller, © 1974 Paramount Pictures Corp. Forty-nine minutes into the film while strolling through a park in Rome, Barry Brown as "Frederick Winterbourn" gives Cybill Shepherd as "Daisy Miller" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake as Frederick says, "I'm very sorry but she insists I ride with her. Will you forgive me?" Daisy turns and walks away with the Italian gentleman. 14 Murder on the Orient Express, © 1974 EMI Film Distributors Ltd. Eleven minutes into the film in the dining room of the hotel in Istanbul, Albert Finny as detective "Poirot" gives a clear Master Mason's handshake to Martin Balsam as "Bianchi" over their dinner table while they are seated. The Man Who Would Be King, © 1975 Devon Company (a movie whose plot involves Freemasons). About twenty-eight minutes into the film Sean Connery as Masonic brother "Daniel Dravof" gives Christopher Plummer as Masonic brother "Rudyard Kipling" a clear, perfectly staged 2nd degree Fellow Craft Masonic handshake just before Dravot and his pal "Peachy" leave for the primitive land of Kafiristan to become kings. Watch Michael Caine as "Peachy" lower his eyes and smile while looking at the Masonic handshake. The Rocky Horror Picture Show, © 1975 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp. About thirty minutes into the film as measured from the singing red lips, "Brad" and Susan Sarandon as "Janet" ride the elevator up to the laboratory on the second floor. Tim Curry as "Dr. Frank-N-Furter" gives Janet a quick Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip before he kisses her hand. The middle of the laboratory's ceiling is blue with white stars (Blue Lodge Masonry). Moments before "Eddie" rides his motorcycle around the laboratory two dancing men wearing black tuxedos clearly give the grand hailing sign of distress of Blue Lodge Masonry. "Eddie" wears a six pointed star on his jacket and a Masonic Maltese cross ring on his left hand. Rocky, © 1976 United Artists Corp. Thirty minutes into the film Thayer David as fight promoter "Jergens" gives a clear Entered Apprentice Mason's handshake to Carl Weathers as world champion "Apollo Creed" over the promoter's desk after Creed decides to fight a local underdog Philadelphia boy. Annie Hall, © 1977 United Artists Corp. One hour and fifteen minutes into the film Paul Simon as "Tony Lacey" has a cocktail party. Lauri Bird as "Tony Lacey's girlfriend," who is dressed in white casual clothing, walks over to Woody Allen and his friend "Rob" played by Tony Roberts. Woody Allen says to the girl, "Here's my food taster. Have you two met?" Tony Roberts gives Lauri Bird a clear Master Mason's handshake. Death on the Nile, © 1978 EMI Films Ltd. Fifteen minutes into the film inside Word Hall mansion Peter Ustinov as detective "Poirot" gives a Master Mason's handshake to David Niven as detective "Colonel Race," then Jack Warden as "Dr. Bessner" gives a Master Mason's handshake to Jon Finch as "Mr. Ferguson, citizen of the world," and then Angela Lansbury as "Mrs. Otterbourne" gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to "Colonel Race." Many Freemasons have been taught that they are "citizens of the world," thus making Freemasonry a strong, behind-the-scenes, influence in the drive for global free trade. The Boys From Brazil, © 1978 ITC Entertainment, Ltd. About thirty-seven minutes into the film Gregory Peck as "Dr. Josef Mengele" gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to James Mason as "Eduard Seibert, chief of Nazi security" on the boat landing after Seibert's arrival in his single engine sea plane to Mengele's South American jungle retreat. The China Syndrome, © 1978 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. About forty-four minutes into the film, Jane Fonda as the ambitious TV reporter "Kimberly Wells," meets Jack Lemmon as "Jack Godell," the ill-fated nuclear power plant's veteran engineer in a nightclub. Jane Fonda shakes hands with Jack Lemmon, however it is not Masonic. Then Jane Fonda turns to her left and receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from Ted, who works at the plant, and then Jane Fonda receives a clear Master Mason's handshake from Ted's wife Elma, both Ted and Elma are seated at the bar. Watch frame by frame. Breaker Morant, © 1979 South Australian Film Corporation. Twenty-six minutes into the film at the beginning of the trial and immediately after the successful questioning of the first witness, Jack Thompson as the defense lawyer "Major Thomas" gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Bryan Brown as defendant 15 "Lt. Handcock" as they sit at the trial defense table. Nine to Five, © 1980 Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation. At the start Jane Fonda as "Judy Burnly" gives her new employer Mr. Hart an Entered Apprentice Mason's handshake in Hart's office. Then Judy gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Dolly Parton as Hart's secretary. Private Benjamin, © 1980 Warner Bros., Inc. About sixteen minutes into the film Goldie Hawn as "Judy Benjamin" gives "Jim" the army recruiter a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake on the street before they go up to the recruiting office. About forty-seven minutes later when "Private Benjamin" goes on leave from basic training she is introduced to two young men in a night club who give her clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes. Raging Bull, © 1980 United Artists Corp. About twenty-one minutes into the film Robert De Niro as prizefighter "Jake LaMotta, the Raging Bull" (pronounced "Jack") and his brother "Joey" go to the Annual Summer Dance at a night club. Just before Jake sits down at the night club table Jake gives the man seated on the viewer's left a clear Master Mason's handgrip then the man standing on the right gives Jake a clear Master Mason's handgrip. The Final Countdown, © 1980 Polyc International B.V. About seven minutes into the film Martin Sheen as "Mr. Laski" gives an Entered Apprentice Masonic handshake to "Commander Dan Thurmand" after Laski lands in a military helicopter on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz. The Gods Must be Crazy, © 1980 C.A.T. Films. Thirty-nine minutes into the film Sandra Prinsloo as school teacher "Kate Thompson" gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Marius Weyers as the clumsy biologist "Andrew Steyn" when they first meet in the African bush. Arthur, © 1981 Orion Pictures Company. About twenty-five minutes into the film Sir John Gielgud as "Hobson" gives Liza Minnelli as "Linda Marolla" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake on the side walk at the bus stop after Linda steals a necktie, watch frame by frame. Later at "Arthur's" engagement party, Dudley Moore as "Arthur" takes Linda's left hand into his own and discreetly gives her a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake by pressing his thumb over her middle knuckle. Moscow Does Not Believe In Tears, © 1981 An IFEX (International Film Exchange) Film Release. Thirty minutes into the film at the dinner party in the Moscow apartment, Vera Alentova as "Katerina" receives a clear center screen Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from Yuri Vasilyev as "Rudy Rachkov" the Soviet television cameraman and Katerina's future lover. Polyester, (Made in 1981). About ten minutes into the film the female impersonator Divine as "Francine" gives a clear Master Mason's handshake to "Freddy" when he comes to pick up Francine's daughter for a date. The Boat (Formerly Das Boot, a German film with English subtitles), © 1981 Bavaria Atelier GMBH. One hour and twenty-nine minutes into the film Jugen Prochnow as the "German submarine Captain" appears to give a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Gunter Lamprecht as the German Captain of the merchant ship Weser in the merchant ship's dining room. The Godfather, (1902-1959, The Complete Epic) © 1981 Paramount Pictures Corp., which includes The Godfather, © 1972 Paramount Pictures Corp., and The Godfather Part II, © 1974 Paramount Pictures Corp., and The Coppola Company. In the very first scene of this complete epic and just before the film credit that says "Starring MARLON BRANDO" a man in a white shirt exchanges perfect Master Mason's handshakes with another man who kisses his middle knuckle. Later as Italian is spoken and above the subtitle: "Augustino 16 Coppola, meet Vito" Robert De Niro as "Vito" receives a perfect Master Mason's handshake from the gunsmith "Coppola." Later during the subtitle: "His family's out of the house," "Clemenza" gives a Masonic handshake to Vito just before Vito kills the neighborhood mafia strongman "Fanuccio." frances, © 1982 EMI Films, Inc. This film is based on the tragic story of actress Frances Farmer. Fortynine minutes into the film Jessica Lange as "Frances Farmer" is escorted to a Hollywood house party by "Bob Barnes" played by Jack Riley. After they enter the house Bob gives party hostess "Connie," who wears a red blouse, a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. The Year of Living Dangerously, © 1982 MGM/UA Entertainment Co. About fifteen minutes into the film Linda Hunt as news cameraman "Billy Kwan" introduces Mel Gibson as the ambitious Australian reporter "Guy Hamilton" to Bill Kerr as the British military attache "Colonel Ralph Henderson" on the hotel's sun deck by the pool in Jakarta, Indonesia. Colonel Henderson gives Guy Hamilton a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. About seventy minutes later the Colonel gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to a woman in a red-flowered Indonesian dress. Tootsie, © 1982 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. About seven minutes into the film at the birthday party for "Michael," Dustin Hoffman as "Michael" gives an Entered Apprentice Mason's handshake to "Patty" who is sitting in a chair. Nineteen minutes later Dustin Hoffman as "Tootsie" receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from "Joel" and then a Master Mason's handshake from "Phil" while Tootsie sits next to his theatrical agent in the lounge of the Russian Tea Room. Nine minutes later on the set of the television soap opera, Tootsie is introduced as the new hospital administrator. Tootsie gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Jessica Lange as "Julie" who sits on the floor and says, "Hi hi, we met the other day, Julie Nichols hospital slut." J.F.K. From Boyhood To Presidency, © 1983 Media Home Entertainment Inc., (narrated by Cliff Robertson). Eight minutes into the film on January 23, 1953 John F. Kennedy with three other new arrivals to the senate stand before Vice President of the United States Alben W. Barkley to be sworn in as U.S. Senators. Vice President Barkley hesitates before taking Kennedy's hand. Kennedy gives Barkley a clear Master Mason's handshake. The fourth senator on viewers' extreme right gives Barkley a cocked-thumb handshake then momentarily releases his grip then immediately thrusts his thumb against Barkley's middle knuckle. I guess he was determined to get his point across. Thirteen minutes later after Jacqueline Kennedy steps out of a car on a state protocol visit to see General DeGaulle of France, Jackie gives a woman (Mrs. DeGaulle?) a clear Masonic handshake, then Jackie turns and gives General DeGaulle a Masonic handshake. Masonic handshakes happen at social occasion. Four minutes later Harvard man Kennedy gives a Masonic handshake and receives an honorary Law Degree from Yale University. Two minutes later Kennedy receives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from a smiling man holding a 35mm camera. I find it interesting that ten minutes later Kennedy says, "Now 1 know that there are some people who say that this (wages, prices, and profits) isn't any business of the President of the United States (Kennedy then hesitates). . . and a . . . that a . . . what a . . . and who believe that the President of the United States should be the honorary chairman of a great fraternal organization and confine himself to ceremonial functions. But that isn't what the Constitution says. And I did not run for President of the United States to fulfill that office in that way." As Kennedy reaches the bottom of Air Force One's stairway he is given a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from a senior Air Force officer. Dean Rusk receives a Masonic handshake from the foreign minister of Russia and the foreign minister of Great Britain after the signing of the nuclear test ban treaty. Wargames, © 1983 United Artists Corporation. David the young computer hacker breaks into the Defense Department's master war computer to play a video game. David turns his computer off while playing the game because he has to take out the garbage. As David returns home from school the next day he enters through the front door, the television news is on and these words can be heard, "The flames began at a prophylactic recycling 17 center at the edge of the . . ." (then garbled). Moments later the news clearly announces, "For three and a half minutes last night the defense forces of the United States went on a full scale nuclear alert believing that the Soviet Union had launched a surprise missile attack." Is this use of subliminal words part of the conditioning of the mass mind to accept prophylactics and recycling centers? Ghostbusters, © 1984 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. Several minutes into the film Dan Aykroyd as "Dr. Stantz" gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to "Roger Delacourt" a library employee wearing a brown suit inside the main branch of the New York public library. The Terminator, © 1984 Cinema 84, a Greenberg Bros. Partnership. About fifty minutes into the film Michael Biehn as "Reese" and Linda Hamilton as "Sarah Connor" are pursued by Arnold Schwarzenegger as "The Terminator" in a high speed car chase at night. The Terminator crashes his stolen car and escapes while the police apprehend Reese and Sarah. The Terminator returns to his apartment and enters through the window. Easily seen under the Venetian blinds is a neon sign across the street that flashes the letters "VD" on and off again for about thirteen seconds. Out Of Africa, © 1985 Universal Pictures Limited. About ten minutes into the film after the quick marriage ceremony to Baron Blixen, Meryl Streep as "Karen" is introduced to Michael Gough as "Lord Delamere." Lord Delamere gives Karen a clear, unmistakable Master Mason's handgrip. Pee-Wee's Big Adventure, © 1985 Warner Bros. Inc. About twenty-five minutes into the film Pee-Wee Herman receives a quick Entered Apprentice Mason's handshake from Mark Holton as "Francis" the guy who stole Pee-Wee's bicycle. Twenty minutes later in the kitchen of the roadside diner Pee-Wee gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Diane Salinger as "Simone" the waitress after Pee-Wee washes the dishes. Then they go out to watch the sun rise. Freemasonry is a nature based, sex and sun worshiping religion. Prizzi's Honor, © 1985 ABC Motion Pictures, Inc. William Hickey as "Don Corrada Prizzi" is the Godfather for the Prizzis, one of the richest crime syndicate families in the country. Nine minutes into the film after the wedding for Prizzi's granddaughter, the bride curtsies for Prizzi and the groom gives Prizzi both left-handed and right-handed Master Mason's hand grips and then the groom kisses the Master Mason's knuckle joint on Prizzi's left hand. One hour and eleven minutes later Kathleen Turner visits Prizzi at his estate. Prizzi says, "You're a fine-looking women." Turner gives Prizzi a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. The camera angle changes to a close-up of Prizzi giving Turner a perfect Master Mason's handgrip that goes on for over thirty seconds. 1986 Aryan World Congress, © 1986 Michael A. Hoffman II, New Traditionalist Films. Toward the end of the film immediately after Joe Tomasi (sp?) of the American Nazi Party finishes his speech, the scene shifts to a man standing at the podium dressed in a suit and tie wearing glasses. Pastor Thorn Rob of the Church of Jesus Christ, who is the last speaker on the agenda, walks to the podium to give the keynote address. The man standing at the podium introduces Thorn Rob and then gives him a clear Master Mason's handshake. Rob appears to reciprocate in kind. Down and Out in Beverly Hills, © 1986 Touchstone Films. About forty-five minutes into the film Richard Dreyfuss as the nouveau riche clothes-hanger maker "Dave Whiteman" takes Nick Nolte as the disconsolate bum "Jerry Baskin" to an outdoor Beverly Hills restaurant for lunch. A woman walks over to their table while they are eating and says, "Didn't I see you at the Cannes film festival?" Jerry says, "Probably " After they talk briefly, Jerry gives the women a perfect Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. 18 F/X, © 1986 Orion Pictures Corporation. Sixty-seven minutes into the film Brian Dennehy as "Lt. Leo McCarthy, N.Y.P.D." exchanges Entered Apprentice Mason's handshakes with Jossie deGuzman as "Velez" the policewomen computer operator after Velez cracks the police case using her computer. Lt. McCarthy kisses Velez's hand at the moment of the Masonic handgrip. Jonathan Winters: On The Ledge, © 1986 A Windsor Castle Production. (A sixty minute comedy film). Three minutes into the film as measured from the beginning announcement that "The following program was improvised without a script. All performances were completely spontaneous." Comedian Martin Mull walks into Jonathan Winters' curiosity shop. Jonathan Winters gives Martin Mull a Master Mason's handshake. Jumpin' Jack Flash, © 1986 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp. About ten minutes into the film Whoopi Goldberg as bank computer terminal operator "Terry Doolittle" receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from Peter Goetz as her boss "Mr. Page" inside his office. There are more Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes later in this film. Queen Elizabeth II: 60 Glorious Years, © 1986 Independent Television News, produced by Granada Television International in association with Independent Television News, Maljack Productions, Inc. About twenty-five minutes into this fifty-five minute film, after British Prime Minister Harold Wilson says, "If she quotes a state document I hadn't read I felt like a school boy who hadn't done his homework," a mature Queen Elizabeth II walks down a line of half a dozen dignitaries who receive Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes from the Queen and her husband. Four minutes later immediately after stepping out of a limousine when the Queen visits Brazil she gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to a man and then gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to a women who curtsies low. The Queen pets two dogs and then gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to another young women who curtsies low. Nine minutes later in the summer of 1966 England wins the world's football (soccer) cup at Wembley. The Queen hands the cup to a football player wearing a red jersey with a white # 6 on his back who gives her a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. The next football player in line after # 6 gives the Queen a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. The next two football players in line do not give Masonic handshakes to the Queen. Baby Boom, © 1987 United Artists Pictures, Inc. Thirteen minutes into the film Diane Keaton as the highpowered career women "J.C. Wiatt" receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from Pat Hingle as "Hugh Laribee" over a restaurant dinner table at a business luncheon. Twenty minutes later J.C.'s boss and his important food chain client "Mr. Everett" enter J.C.'s office to find J.C. doing her motherly chores with the baby. Diane Keaton gives "Mr. Everett" an Entered Apprentice Masonic handshake. Sixty-one minutes later Diane Keaton gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to "Hugh Laribee" as she reenters the fast lane of corporate advertising. Black Widow, © 1987 Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. Thirty-four minutes into the film Debra Winger as Federal undercover agent "Alexandra (Alex) Barnes" gives a quick Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to "William MaCory" the wealthy and soon to die husband of the Black Widow serial killer. Wall Street, © 1987 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. About sixty-five minutes into the film Charlie Sheen as "Bud Fox" the young Wall Street stockbroker is promoted by his firm and receives his own office. Bud's boss Mr. Lynch introduces Bud to his new private secretary "Janet" inside Bud's new office. Bud gives Janet a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Alien Nation, © 1988 Twentieth Century' Fox Film Corporation. About seventeen minutes into the film James Caan as "Detective Sykes" enters police Captain Warner's office to volunteer to work with the alien19 newcomer police detective. In the introductions James Caan shakes hands with "Victor Goldrup" from the mayor's office. Then the alien-newcomer "Sam Francisco" played by Mandy Patinkin gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to "Goldrup." Big Business, © 1988 Touchstone Pictures. About fifty-three minutes into the film in the lobby of the Plaza Hotel a hotel employee says, "This is for you from Sly" and hands an envelope of money to Bette Midler as the simple country girl "Sadie." Sadie takes the envelope and then extends her hand and gives the man a clear Entered Apprentice Mason's handshake. Cocktail, © 1988 Touchstone Pictures. Forty-five minutes into the film Tom Cruise as the young bartender "Brian Flanagan" gives Kelly lynch as "Kerry Coughlin" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake across the outdoor bar in Jamaica. And as always look closely in slow motion and freeze frame. Remembering LIFE, © 1988 PBS Video. Twenty minutes into this 60 minute film after Ralph Graves the former managing editor of LIFE magazine talks about the civil rights movement the scene shifts to a black and white photograph of a civil rights demonstration. A white man wearing a suit and tie sits between two black men who are dressed casually. The black man on the viewer's right receives a clear unmistakable Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from a white man who is just off camera. Stand and Deliver, © 1988 Warner Bros., Inc. About three minutes into the film Edward James Olmos as the high school math teacher "Jaime Escalante" gives Virginia Paris as "Raquel Ortega" the chairman of the math department a clear, center screen Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Twenty-six minutes later Lou Diamond Phillips as "Angel enters Escalante's classroom late and while standing in front of the blackboard gives the grand hailing sign of distress of the Masonic Order of the Knights Templars. This sign is given by extending both arms outward nearly parallel to the floor, palms down, and inclining the head to the right. It is the manner in which Jesus Christ was nailed to the cross. Diana, The Making of a Princess, © 1989 Independent Television News, Limited; London, U.K., distributed by Questar Video, Inc., P.O. Box 11345, Chicago, IL 60611. About nineteen minutes into the film after the royal wedding ceremony Prince Charles and Princess Di walk between two massive stone pillars as they leave the cathedral. Prince Charles puts on his white hat and then immediately receives a Master Mason's handshake from someone standing off camera to the viewer's right. Watch the expression on Prince Charles' face change from one of gaiety to sober caution. After Prince Charles and Princess Di meet the Pope, the scene changes to Prince Charles and Di's meeting with President Reagan and Nancy Reagan. Reagan, "the great communicator," in his dinner speech apparently forgets who his special guests are and mispronounces their names!! Immediately the scene shifts to Princess Di in a red dress with flowers in hand bending over to shake some hands. Above and behind her left shoulder, clearly seen in freeze-frame, is a dark-skinned hand wearing a long-sleeve white shirt that reaches out to receive a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from a white skinned hand wearing a long-sleeve red shirt. This takes place in front of a woman wearing a black skirt and a white long-sleeve blouse who clasps her hands together to form a white Masonic square against the black background of her skirt. This subliminal Masonic handshake takes place directly above the women's clasped hands. Driving Miss Daisy, © 1989 Warner Bros., Inc. About twenty-six minutes into the film after Jessica Tandy as "Miss Daisy" finishes singing in the synagogue the rabbi gives the first two women to leave the temple clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes. Miss Daisy who follows appears to receive a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. 20 Great T. V. News Stories, The Great Debates: John F. Kennedy vs. Richard M. Nixon, © 1989 ABC NEWS, Inc. One minute into the film in the first televised Presidential debate September 26, 1960 at BBN TV Chicago, Nixon gives Kennedy a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake in the midst of reporters and photographers. Kennedy's thumb is behind Nixon's hand and cannot be seen. Roger & Me, © 1989 Warner Bros., Inc. Michael Moore tries to meet the Chairman of General Motors to persuade him to visit Moore's hometown of Flint, Michigan to see the devastating effects that the GM plant closures have had on the workers. About seven minutes into the film Moore says, "So this is GM Chairman Roger Smith. He appeared to have a brilliant plan. First close eleven factories in the U.S. then open eleven in Mexico where you pay the workers seventy cents an hour. Then use the money you saved by building cars in Mexico to take over other companies, preferably high-tech firms and weapons manufacturers. Next tell the Union you're broke and they happily agree to give back a couple of billion dollars in wage cuts." Scene shifts to a black and white photograph of smiling General Motors Chairman Roger Smith receiving a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from a smiling high-ranking Union official over a long conference table. Ghost, © 1990 Paramount Pictures. One hour and twenty-six minutes into the film inside the bank, Whoopi Goldberg as "Rita Miller" receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip from Bruce Jarchow as "Lyle Ferguson" moments before Rita receives a four million dollar cashiers' check from Lyle. Guilty by Suspicion, © 1990 Warner Bros. Inc. At the beginning of the film after Robert De Niro as "David Merrill" the soon to be blacklisted movie director arrives home from France to a surprise party, Merrill walks into the house and immediately gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to a man wearing a dark suit and red tie. Twelve minutes later in the Brown Derby restaurant Merrill walks into the lounge and gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to a man leaning against a square pillar who is chatting with another man. Merrill takes a step and pauses for a word with "Mr. Woods" and then walks to a table where his theatrical agent "Burt" is talking on a phone. As Merrill sits down he gives Burt a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. In the next scene Merrill goes to see his lawyer in regards to testifying before a Congressional committee. Merrill drives up to a rundown hotel in his white sports car. Seen directly above the car is a giant shop sign in the form of a revolver handgun that reads "COWAN'S GUN SHOP" on the barrel. A "Cowan" is an esoteric Masonic term for anyone who does not belong inside a Masonic lodge. Merrill walks inside the hotel and climbs the stairs to a room on the second floor (Masonic lodge meetings are rarely held on the first floor). Merrill is then introduced to "Ray Cohen" from the Congressional committee who is there to persuade Merrill to "name the names" of possible Communist associates. The camera zooms in for a tight close-up of their handshake. However, it doesn't qualify as a 1 st, 2nd, or 3rd degree Masonic handshake. It seems that those responsible for putting this scene together wanted to convey the idea that the character "Merrill" is showing that he is not among friends in this situation by using a handgrip that is not Masonic. Mr. Destiny, © 1990 Touchstone Pictures. Five minutes into the film young baseball player Bryan Buffinton as "Larry" gives a perfect Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to young Sari Caine (Michael Caine's daughter). Presumed Innocent, © 1990 Warner Bros. Inc. At the beginning a female attorney for the county prosecutor's office is found dead in her apartment. Harrison Ford as "Rusty Sabich" the women's legal colleague and former lover later stands trial for her murder. About fifteen minutes into the film at her funeral and before the trial Rusty walks down the isle of the church and stops to shake hands with "Nico Delia Guardia" the man who will prosecute Rusty. They shake hands but it is not Masonic. As Rusty walks away he is followed by Paul Winfield as "Judge Lyttle" who will be the judge at Rusty's trial. Judge Lyttle gives "Nico" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. At the end of the film Judge Lyttle is discovered to have taken bribes in his judicial past. The 21 dead female attorney was his lover and bribe courier. Judge Lyttle dismisses the case against Rusty to keep this from becoming known. Is this an example of Masonic justice? And it turns out that Rusty's wife killed the girl. Saddam Hussein: Defying the World, a Visual Biography, © 1990 Independent Television News Ltd. The year is 1968 at the mid point in this thirty-four minute historical film. The Ba'th Socialist party seizes power in Iraq in the person of Colonel Hasan al-Bakr. "He would foster the career of Saddam Hussein . . ." Colonel al-Bakr receives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from a man wearing a suit who bows at the end of the brief press photo session. One minute later President al-Bakr receives a Master Mason's handshake from a Soviet diplomat before they negotiate a $300 million loan. They kiss each other on the cheek. The First Power, © 1990 Nelson Films Inc. Forty-seven minutes into the film inside a Catholic church Lou Diamond Phillips as "police detective Logan" gives a confessional to a priest. The priest turns out to be the dreaded "Pentagram Killer" played by Jeff Kober. While standing on the church's alter the Pentagram Killer dressed as a priest gives the grand hailing sign of distress of the Masonic Order of the Knights Templars. The Freshman, © 1990 Tri-Star Pictures, Inc. Seventeen minutes into the film Marlon Brando as the Godfather-like "Carmine Sabatini" gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to Matthew Broderick as "Clark Kellogg" when they first meet in the Italian social club. Fifty-two minutes later Kellogg gives Sabatini a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake inside Kellogg's school dormitory room. Total Recall, © 1990 Carolco Pictures, Inc. Sixty six minutes into the film, as measured from the film's opening title, on the planet Mars, amnesia induced victim Arnold Schwarzenegger as a secret agent, who is regaining his memory, shoots his secret agency provided wife in the forehead. As Arnold and his old girlfriend leave the shooting scene, a clear large red number six appears three consecutive times in clear succession on a full screen television display monitor, an unmistakable "666" subliminal video implant, then the bad guys immediately go after Arnold and his friends. BOYZ 'N THE HOOD, © 1991 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. About one hour and fifteen minutes into the film Larry Fishburne as "Furious Styles" meets Angela Bassett as "Reva Styles" in an upscale, suit and tie restaurant away from the ghetto neighborHOOD to talk about their son "Tre." Furious approaches the table and greets Reva who is seated. Furious receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from Reva. Frankie & Johnny, © 1991 Paramount Pictures. About ten minutes into the film Al Pacino as "Johnny" applies for a job as a short-order cook in a New York City coffee shop. "Nick" the owner of the shop, wearing a sling on his right arm, hires Johnny and extends his left hand. Johnny gives Nick a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse, © 1991 ZM Productions. About one hour and fifteen minutes into the film Marlon Brando appears on location in the Philippines to begin his role in the film Apocalypse Now. As they stand next to each other, a baldheaded Marlon Brando receives a handshake from film director Francis Coppola. Coppola at first covers the handshake with his left hand. Coppola then leans over and kisses Brando on the cheek. As Coppola pulls back the Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip he is giving Brando can easily be seen. About eleven minutes later a bare-chest Coppola says, "... And finally you say fuck it. I don't care if I'm pretentious or not pretentious, or if I've done it or haven't done it, all I know is that I'm going to see this movie. And that for me it has to have some answers. I don't mean just a punch line, (I mean) answers on about forty-seven different levels." Coppola lets slip his training about the symbolic Masonic forty-seventh problem of Euclid. 22 JFK, © 1991 Warner Bros., Regency Enterprises V.O.F. & Le Studio Canal+ (two cassettes, Part I & II). The first scenes at the beginning of the video tape show Jackie and JFK shaking hands with a crowd of admirers. The words "Rock The Vote" are seen in the lower right side of the screen. JFK receives two closeup Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes from two people in the crowd. Then Jackie receives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from someone in the crowd. And then JFK receives another clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from someone in the crowd. This is seen in the Rock The Vote Action Project that precedes the movie JFK. About forty minutes into part two of JFK after the shooting in Dealy Plaza patrolman Joe Smith stops and questions a man. The man produces a Secret Service badge. The questioning stops and the man moves off. Scene shifts to courtroom where patrolman Smith is testifying on the witness stand. He says, "Afterward it didn't ring true but at the time--we were so pressed for time." Immediately scene shifts to a tall young man wearing a dark suit. He has his left hand up to his ear as if listening to an ear phone. This man turns toward the camera and clearly gives a Masonic sign of distress. He holds the palm of the left hand up and crosses it with the right hand palm down. This is done several times at waist level with the hands held out about twelve inches from the body. It is the sign of distress in the Entered Apprentice, first degree of Freemasonry. The Naked Gun 2 1/2: The Smell of Fear, © 1991 Paramount Pictures Corp. About sixteen minutes into the film Priscilla Presley as "Jane" introduces two of the film's leading men to each other. Robert Goulet as "Quintan Hapsburg" gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip to Leslie Nielsen as "Lt. Frank Drebin." Twenty-six minutes later Frank goes to Jane's apartment. Jane goes to the refrigerator, crawls inside to get something, and then disappears inside with the door closing behind her. Frank opens the door and extends his right hand. Jane gives Frank a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip as he pulls her out of the refrigerator. Citizen Cohn, © 1992 Home Box Office, Inc. One hour and eleven minutes into the film James Woods as the controversial lawyer "Roy Cohn" introduces Mafia figure "Carmine Gelanti" played by Sam Coppola to Cohn's wealthy client "Iva Schlesinger" played by Tovah Feldshuh. Carmine, who wears a dark suit and white scarf, gives a clear Master Mason's handshake to Iva wearing a red low-cut evening dress. About two minutes later John F. Kennedy filmed in black and white receives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from a women sitting in a car as the background music plays Camelot. Seconds later while riding in a motorcade JFK receives Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes from a man and then a women while Jackie looks on. One minute later Joseph Bologna as "Walter Winchell" gives Roy Cohn a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake over a dinner table. After the film's tragic ending the last message on the screen is, "Iva Schlesinger lived happily ever after." Hoffa, © 1992 Twentieth Century Fox. About twenty-five minutes into the film the Teamsters Union wins the strike against Kreger. During the Teamsters' celebration meeting Jack Nicholson as "Hoffa" leaves the building with friends. At the bottom of the front steps J.T. Walsh as "Fritz" introduces his nephew "Pete Connelly" to Hoffa. Pete gives Hoffa a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Hoffa waves his hand away slightly disgusted. Sixty minutes later Danny DeVito as "Bobby" arrives at the Copacabana nightclub to deliver a message. After Bobby is told to leave the club, Bobby puts a gun to the head of Sally Stein the club's owner and pushes their way downstairs through the club to the back room where Armand Assante as "Dally" the man who "fixed" the Teamsters' pension fund greets them. Stein wants revenge for this outrage. Dally says to Stein, "Now this man (Bobby) is like a brother to me and this man should be treated with the same respect with which you treat me." Dally walks over and receives a Perfect Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from Bobby. Oscar's Greatest Moments, 1971-to-1991, © 1992 Academy Foundation. About one hour and twentyseven minutes into the film Clarence Nash (the voice of cartoon character Donald Duck) accepts an Oscar from Johnny Carson in 1983. Nash speaking to the audience using the voice of Donald Duck says, "Thank you very much. I love you all. Ooooo." Carson says, "Thank you, thank you Duck," and extends his right hand. Nash gives Carson a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake that is clearly seen in freeze-frame. 23 Sister Act, © 1992 Touchstone Pictures. Sixty minutes into the film two nuns walk up to two women standing on the street. The woman with blond hair extends her hand and gives the nun on viewers' left a perfect Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Scene immediately shifts to a choir of nuns singing "rap" music. Straight Talk, © 1992 Hollywood Pictures Company. About forty-four minutes into the film James Woods as "Jack" takes Dolly Parton as talk-show celebrity "Dr. Shirlee" out on their first date. The maitre d' at the restaurant gives Dolly Parton's left hand a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. Seven minutes later, on a television talk-show, Dolly Parton receives a Master Mason's handgrip from Spalding Gray as "Dr. David Ergman." This is seen on the large studio monitor screen behind the cameraman on the viewer's right. Watch frame by frame. The Kennedys, The Early Years, 1900-1961, © 1992 WGBH Boston Educational Foundation (coproduction of WGBH/Boston and Thames Television, London). Fifty-seven minutes into the film after a TV interview sponsored by LONGINES CHRONOSCOPE pictured on the wall behind the interviewers, this film's narrator says, "Jack Kennedy was moving now into the Democratic mainstream preparing for a new political battle . . ." JFK begins to campaign for the Senate. After a Member of Congress speaks the scene quickly shifts to an open gate in front of a brick building where workers are apparently leaving. JFK gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to a women and then JFK gives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to a man carrying a lunch pail under his arm. Scenes shift rapidly while the music plays, "Who can fight and fight till he wins, Kennedy can, Kennedy can ..." JFK receives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from a man in a machine shop. There are Masonic hand grips later in this film. The Kennedys, The Later Years 1962-1980, © 1992 WGBH Boston Educational Foundation (coproduction of WGBH/Boston and Thames Television, London). Fifty-three minutes from the start of the tape New York Senator Kenneth Keating denounces Robert Kennedy's Senatorial nomination by saying, "What can a fellow brought in from Massachusetts . .. know about the problems of New York?" Then Robert Kennedy filmed in black and white walks through a crowd shaking hands. The last hand Kennedy shakes gives Kennedy a nearly full screen Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. Scene then shifts to RFK campaigner Peter Edelman who speaks. Twenty-six minutes later immediately after Mike Wallace of CBS News announces that "Robert Kennedy has won the Democratic primary in the State of Nebraska," Robert Kennedy walks along a fence shaking hands with admirers. A dark-skinned hand gives Kennedy a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Watch the security guard behind Kennedy reach for a gun inside his suit jacket as this happens?! At the end of the film just before Edward Kennedy announces his candidacy for President of the United States in 1979, Edward Kennedy walks toward the podium to give his announcement. He stops and kisses his mother Rose Kennedy who wears a wide brim hat and gives her a handshake that is not at first Masonic. Edward Kennedy then changes this handshake into a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip and his smile beams toward his mother. The Mambo Kings, © 1992 Warner Bros., Regency Enterprises V.O.F. & Le Studio Canal+. Fifteen minutes into the film while Armand Assante as mambo-king "Cesar" is playing the mambo music on stage at the Palladium Club a man is shot dead on the dance floor. After the police arrive, Cesar introduces himself to the blond cigarette girl "Lanna Lake" played by Cathy Moriarty. At first Lanna Lake's handshake is not Masonic but then she presses her thumb against Cesar's middle knuckle while she says, "Honey you are the cat's meow on stage." The dead man's body lies in the background directly behind her Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. Seventeen minutes later after the mambo-kings finish their musical act Cesar's brother, Nestor introduces his new girl friend "Delores" played by Maruschka Detmers to Cesar. Delores gives Cesar a clear center screen Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Twenty-one minutes later at the wedding reception for Nestor and Delores, Celia Cruz as "Evalina" sings Guantanamera as she walks around the room giving Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes to several young men. 24 Under Siege, © 1992 Warner Bros. One hour and thirty-seven minutes into the film just before Steven Seagal gives Erika Eleniak a victory kiss on the deck of the USS Missouri, Damian Chapa as "Tackman" gives his navy buddy a quick Fellow Craft Masonic handshake seen in freeze-frame, watch closely. White Men Can't Jump, © 1992 Twentieth Century Fox. Five minutes into the film after Wesley Snipes as "Sidney" blocks a basketball shot on the outdoor basketball court, Sidney walks to the edge of the court and gives a man holding a basketball a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Twenty-eight minutes later after Sidney and Woody Harrelson as "Billy" pull off their first basketball money making hustle, Billy and Rosie Perez as "Gloria" drop Sidney at his apartment house. Sidney walks around the car and gives Gloria a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Forty-nine minutes later after "Robert" the basketball playing security guard for the Jeopardy TV game show makes a basket on his outdoor basketball court, he gives a quick Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to a fellow player who holds a basketball. Twelve minutes later at the end of the film after Sidney's apartment has been robbed, Sidney runs across a street to greet Billy and Gloria. Sidney using his left hand gives Billy a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. Because Woody Harrelson's father Charles Harrelson has in some circles been implicated in the assassination of JFK, I find it interesting that early in the film Billy tells his girlfriend Gloria a funny Jeopardy TV game show question. (What were) "The last words of Lee Harvey Oswald?--It wasn't me, it was the C.I.AAaagh!" Billy then grimaces the way Oswald did after being shot by Jack Ruby. Halfway through the film at the Brotherhood Tournament Billy taunts his future basketball opponents by saying, "What? Are you still throwing those bricks (basketballs)? What is this a Mason's convention?" Born Yesterday, © 1993 Hollywood Pictures Company. Twelve minutes into the film at the Washington, D.C. cocktail party Melanie Griffith as "Billie Dawn" receives Master Mason's handshakes from "Alex" and his wife "Beatrice." Sixty minutes later Fred Dalton Thompson as "Senator Hedges" gives Billy a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., A Historical Perspective, © 1993 Xenon Entertainment Group, 211 Arizona Ave., Santa Monica, CA 90401. About nine minutes into this 60 minute film as the voice of Dr. King is heard in the background the scene shifts to a smiling Catholic priest walking beside a bus. A woman with a big smile gets off the bus. Then a smiling businessman wearing a hat and eyeglasses follows the women and is greeted by a man standing beside the bus who gives him a Master Mason's handshake. Several minutes later while this film's narrator says, "On November 13, 1956 the Supreme Court declared bus segregation illegal. Dr. King had demonstrated his skills as a leader and experienced his first triumph in the fight for equality." Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from a fellow civil rights leader. Dr. King's wife stands behind King's right shoulder. In the Line of Fire, © 1993 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. Twenty-nine minutes into the film at a state dinner in the French embassy Jim Curley as the "President of the United States," along with dignitaries and Secret Service agents, descends a red carpeted staircase. Immediately upon reaching the bottom the President receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from an admirer on the viewer's right. Jackie Onassis-An Intimate Portrait, © 1993 Ellen M. Krass Productions, Inc. Nine minutes into this 46 minute film Jackie and JFK are interviewed about their first meeting. As the narrator says, "In that Washington spring of 1951 the initial attraction was there but the time was not," Jackie and JFK are filmed strolling toward the camera. JFK receives a perfect Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from a smiling man holding a 35mm camera. Twelve minutes later after JFK's inauguration, Jackie and JFK attend an inauguration ball. Jackie and JFK walk from right to left across the screen. JFK clearly gives a man a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Three minutes later while on a visit to France Jackie clearly gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to a women. Jackie then turns to her left and gives General Charles DeGaulle a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. JFK stands behind DeGaulle. Nine minutes later Bobby Kennedy campaigns in the spring of 1968 and shakes hands above a 25 small crowd of well-wishers. Bobby Kennedy clearly gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to an admirer. Jurassic Park, © 1993 Universal City Studios, Inc., & Amblin Entertainment, Inc. About three minutes into the film Jurassic Park's lawyer arrives at the Amber Mine's boat dock and appears to receive a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from the mine's foreman. Seven minutes later Richard Attenborough as "John Hammond" the owner of Jurassic Park gives Laura Dern as "Ellie" the paleobotanist a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake inside the travel trailer in the Badlands desert near Snakewater, Montana. Seconds later Hammond says, "And there's no doubt our attractions will drive kids out of their minds." Matinee, © 1993 Universal City Studios, Inc. Twenty-eight minutes into the film John Goodman as the scifi movie maker "Lawrence Woolsey" gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to a man representing "Citizens for Decent Entertainment" in front of the matinee theater. Thirty minutes later Woolsey's phoney nurse, who has been making the kids sign release forms saying that if the movie scares them to death it's not Woolsey's fault, gives an Entered Apprentice Masonic handshake to movie mogul "Mr. Specter" in the matinee's lobby. Mrs. Doubtfire, © 1993 Twentieth Century Fox. About thirty-eight minutes into the film Lisa Jakub as "Lydia" gives Robin Williams as the new housekeeper "Mrs. Doubtfire" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip as they are introduced. About twenty-five minutes later Pierce Brosnan as "Stu" comes to the house to meet the kids. Stu gives Robin Williams as "Mrs. Doubtfire" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake when they first meet. At the end of the movie after Mrs. Doubtfire saves Stu from choking on his dinner and Mrs. Doubtfire's real identity is revealed to everyone, Robin Williams gives Stu a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake as they depart from the dinner table. Robert Ripley, Believe It or Not, © 1993 Turner Broadcasting System. Nineteen minutes into the film Ripley on December 2, 1923 embarks on his first trip around the world. Ripley receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from a man in a light-colored suit. Seventeen minutes later in an old motion picture newsreel, Col. Charles Lindbergh gives a clear, close-up Fellow Craft Masonic handshake through the window of his airplane just before taking off on his trans-Atlantic flight. Thirty-nine minutes later Ripley gives a disabled World War II veteran, who is seated in a wheel chair, a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Schindler's List, © 1993 MCA Universal Home Video® box that contains the two VHS cassettes. Two hands are clasped together on the front cover of the box. The right hand extending from above gives a Master Mason's handgrip (pressing its thumb between the second and third knuckle joints on the other hand) to the small hand of a child wearing a dull-red shirt reaching up from below. The Firm, © 1993 Paramount Pictures Corp. About twenty-three minutes into the film at the funeral for the law firm's two slain attorneys, Jeanne Tripplehorn as "Abby McDeere" greets Gene Hackman as "Avery Tolar" with a quick handshake that is not at first Masonic but then she immediately moves her thumb and presses it firmly over the first finger joint on Tolar's hand clearly giving him an Entered Apprentice Mason's handgrip that lasts for over ten seconds as they walk and talk in the cemetery. One hour and twenty-two minutes later when Abby meets Tolar at a night club in the Cayman Islands, Tolar greets her by taking her left hand with his right and clearly gives her a close-up center screen Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip. Thirty minutes later Tom Cruise meets "the boys from Chicago" in a hotel room in Memphis, TN. A large pyramid is seen through the window of their penthouse suite. The pyramid is a symbol of Egypt as the legendary birthplace of Freemasonry. The Wonderful Horrible Life of Leni Riefenstahl, © 1993 Omega Film GMBH, Nomad Films S.P.R.I. (two cassettes, Part I & II). Five minutes into part two this film's narrator says, "For the first time in many years Riefenstahl is reunited with two of her old cameramen." Leni Riefenstahl wearing a red overcoat stands between the two cameramen. The cameraman on the viewer's right who is later called "Guzzi" gives Lady Riefenstahl a 26 clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Forty-four minutes later Riefenstahl speaks in German about Hitler's image at the war's beginning. Immediately after the English subtitle, "I was appalled. His image was totally shattered," the scene shifts to Adolph Hitler inspecting a line of soldiers. Hitler shakes hands with one of the soldiers in the line, it is a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Clear and Present Danger, © 1994 Paramount Pictures Corp. Harrison Ford as the CIA Deputy Chief of Intelligence "Jack Ryan" who has a naive, boy scout type personality arrives in Bogota, Columbia to investigate drug cartels. Forty-three minutes into the film Ryan goes to his hotel to check for messages. Willem Dafoe as "Clark" the deadly CIA field agent greets Ryan in the lobby with an Entered Apprentice Masonic handshake. I Love Trouble, © 1994 (Touchstone Home Video). About twenty-five minutes into the film at the cocktail party Nick Nolte as newspaperman "Peter Braket" gives an Entered Apprentice Masonic handshake to rival newspaperwomen Julia Roberts as "Sabrina Peterson" just as a newspaper photographer takes their picture. About thirty minutes later inside the State Capital building Braket gives Marsha Mason as "Senator Gayle Robbins" a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake as they ascend a staircase. About twenty minutes later after their hijacked car spins dizzily out of control on a rainy night and safely comes to rest on the shoulder of the road Peterson in the front passenger seat extends her right hand. While sitting behind the wheel Braket gives her a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip and says, "You're welcome." Maverick, © 1994 Warner Bros., & Icon Distribution, Inc. Seven minutes into the film Mel Gibson as "Bret Maverick" gives Jodie Foster as "Annabelle Bradsford" a clear Master Mason's handshake when they first meet at the poker table inside the saloon. Seconds later Bret gives Annabelle another Master Mason's handgrip over the poker table. Twenty-five minutes later James Garner as "Zane Cooper" gives Annabelle a Master Mason's handshake when they meet on the ferry boat. Forty-eight minutes later while standing in the midst of a crowd of gentlemen admirers Annabelle receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handgrip from Bret as he says, "Miss Annabelle can I have a word with you please." Moon Shot, © 1994 Turner Broadcasting System Productions, Inc. (two cassettes, part 1 & 2). Seventy minutes into part 2, the ill-fated Apollo 13 spacecraft returns safely to earth. The scene shifts to the Mission Control center in Houston where a flurry of six joyous Master Masons' Masonic handshakes are exchanged by the mission controllers. Naked Gun 33 1/3: the Final Insult, © 1994 Paramount Pictures. About seventeen minutes into the film in a flashback to "the 1970's big disco shootout" Leslie Nielsen as "Lt. Frank Drebin" gives George Kennedy as "Ed" a center screen Fellow Craft Masonic handshake along with some hand-jive over a cocktail table. Renaissance Man, © 1994 Cinergi Pictures Entertainment, Inc. Danny DeVito is the down-on-his-luck businessman "Bill Rago" who takes a job teaching a class of underachieving misfits in the U.S. Army. Twenty-two minutes into the film Bill asks the class, "What's a double-d?" One Private says, "The whole fort calls us double-ds." Another Private says, "Yea, dumb as dog shit." The two Privates bark like dogs as they exchange Fellow Craft Masonic handshakes. Twenty-four minutes later Bill explains the definition of an oxymoron and then says, "Parting is such sweet sorrow." Greg Sporleder as the red-headed Private "Mel Melvin" gives Danny DeVito a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake as Melvin leaves the class room. Stargate, © 1994 Le Studio Canal+. Fifty-six minutes into the film after the ancient Egyptian nomad girl agrees to help James Spader as "Daniel" find the special stargate symbol, Daniel gives her a center screen close-up Entered Apprentice Masonic handshake. 27 The Client, © 1994 Warner Bros. Thirty-two minutes into the film eleven-year-old "Mark Sway," who has knowledge of a Mob murder, is questioned by government agents in a hospital meeting room. "Thomas Fink" the Assistant United States Attorney gives Mark a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake moments before he advises Mark not to be represented by an attorney. Mark leaves for the bathroom. Moments later Susan Sarandon as "Reggie Love" enters the meeting room and introduces herself as Mark's attorney. Susan Sarandon receives a Master Mason's handshake from Tommy Lee Jones as the ambitious federal prosecutor. Then she receives another Master Mason's handshake from New Orleans' FBI agent "Lawrence Trueman." Sixty-nine minutes from the film's beginning a large pyramid is clearly seen in the skyline above the courthouse in Memphis, TN moments before Reggie pleads to have her client Mark put into the witness protection program. Twenty-three minutes later Reggie and Mark drive toward the pyramid at night as they flee from the hospital. Memphis in ancient Egypt is thought by many Masonic historians to be where the oldest of the "ancient mysteries" were taught which many of the rituals of Freemasonry are modeled after. The secret initiation into the Egyptian "mysteries" consisted of some dialog, rituals, contrasts between light (living) and darkness (dying), death, and regeneration. The candidates underwent symbolic trials, failures, and death before being purified and regenerated amid much rejoicing. The lesson was that man by using his own efforts can achieve Divinity. The pyramid is symbolic of Egypt as the birthplace of Freemasonry. The Little Rascals, © 1994 Universal City Studios, Inc. & Amblin Entertainment, Inc. About four minutes into the film "Spanky" as President of the "He-Man Womun Haters Club" enters The Little Rascals' club house and immediately receives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from the boy on the viewer's right. Then Spanky gives a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to the boy on the viewer's left. And then Spanky gives another Fellow Craft Masonic handshake to "Buckwheat" who wears pigtails. Spanky then says "welcome" to the Japanese boy and gives him a handshake that is not Masonic. Fifty-three minutes later Spanky and "Alfalfa" reconcile their differences about "girls" and become friends again. Spanky gives Alfalfa a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. Thirteen minutes later after Alfalfa wins the go-cart race, Spanky extends his hand of friendship and an offer to join the He-Man Womun Haters Club to the young go-cart driver who helped Alfalfa win the race. The young driver wearing a helmet and silver racing suit approaches quietly and gives Spanky a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake. After the young driver takes off the helmet everyone sees that the driver is Alfalfa's girlfriend "Darla" and Spanky faints. The admittance of the "girls" into the Rascals' club house at the end of the film demonstrates the politically correct notion of no discrimination on the basis of sex. The Rascals' club house becomes a "hate-free" zone. The Little Rascals represent in miniature the actual inner workings of a Masonic lodge and the overall cohesiveness of the Masonic fraternity. The Mask, © 1994 New Line Productions, Inc. Four minutes into the film Cameron Diaz as the attractive "Tina Carlyle" wearing a red low-cut dress enters the bank to open a new account. Jim Carrey as the nervously smitten "Stanley Ipkiss" gives her a Fellow Craft Masonic handshake while they are seated. Five minutes later Stanley and his bank friend "Charley" go to the hottest new joint in town called the Coco Bongo Club. At the club's crowded entrance Charley presses money into the palm of "Bobby" the club's bouncer at the same time Bobby gives Charley a hurried Master Mason's handshake. Charley gets into the club while Stanley is thrown out into the street. The Paper, © 1994 Universal City Studios, Inc. Forty-three minutes into the film inside his newspaper editor's office Michael Keaton as newspaperman "Henry Hackett" receives a clear Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from his newspaper buddy "Lou," played by Geoffrey Owens who wears glasses and a dark plaid shirt, after Henry is rewarded with cheers by his newspaper peers for stealing a hot news story at a job interview at a rival newspaper. True Lies, © 1994 Lightstorm Entertainment, Inc. Twenty-three minutes into the film Tia Carrere as the Persian art dealer "Juno Skinner," who is in league with international terrorists, gives Arnold Schwarzenegger, as 28 special agent "Harry" the spy, a clear center screen Entered Apprentice Masonic handshake in the reception room of her office. Brain Candy, © 1996 by Paramount Pictures and Lakeshore Entertainment. Forty-seven minutes into this strange comedy film, "Cancer Boy" sits in a wheelchair wearing a red baseball cap with the letter "C" on the front. "Dr. Chris Cooper," the inventor of the brain candy drug Gleemonex that makes everyone feel happy until they unfortunately go into a coma, gives "Cancer Boy" a perfect Master Masons handshake. "Cancer Boy" then says, "Ouch, that's O.K. my marrow is just low." Phenomenon, © 1996 Touchstone Pictures, Inc. About forty-one minutes into the film, as measured from the film's opening title, "Professor John Ringold" drives up to the farmhouse of "George Malley" played by John Travolta. A big dog jumps up to the car door, then "Malley" gives the "Professor" a Master Mason's handgrip through the open car window, watch closely in freeze frame. And then "Malley's" colored friend "Nate Pope" gives the "Professor" a Master Mason's Handgrip. One hour and fifteen minutes later "Nate Pope's" pregnant Portuguese housekeeper gives a Master Mason's handgrip to a women seated in the town's tavern. The Island of Dr. Moreau, © 1996 New Line Productions, Inc. Thirty-two minutes into the film Marlon Brando as "Dr. Moreau" introduces his human-animal experiments to a shocked Mr. Douglas. Douglas gives the grotesquely deformed dwarf a perfect Master Mason's handgrip. When We Were Kings, © 1996 DASFilms Ltd. In 1974 Muhammad Ali and George Foreman go to Zaire in Africa to fight a heavyweight championship boxing match. Thirty minutes into the film the President of Zaire, Mobutu Sese Seko, receives a very quick Master Mason's handgrip from someone off screen on the viewer's right. Watch closely frame by frame. Mobutu then clasps his hands around his walking staff, glances at the camera, turns to his right and walks to his waiting chauffeured car. Contact, © 1997 Warner Bros. Nine minutes into the film Jodie Foster as radio astronomer "Ellie Arroway" receives a perfect Master Mason's handgrip from "Kent" her new blind astronomer associate inside the Arecibo radio telescope observatory. Seconds later "Ellie" receives a perfect Fellow Craft Masonic handshake from the black radio astronomer "Dr. Vernon." Note 1: This list of 194 films with Masonic handshakes was collected by viewing over 450 VHS tapes picked mostly by my random selection from the popular video department of a public library and local video store. Each film was viewed on a regular 13-inch color TV using a 4-head VCR, certainly not high-tech equipment. This list was made as a guide so that those who have not been initiated into the Masonic Order can see the three most commonly used secret Masonic handshakes of Freemasonry using readily available video resources. If I have stimulated a new awareness of a particular historical secretive association of men and women who give secret hand signals between themselves and others then I have succeeded. It is with this hope that I have compiled these pages. Note 2: The Encyclopedia Britannic a defines Freemasonry as "a term descriptive of the fraternity to which men called Freemasons belong. It is secret in so far as it has rituals and other matters which those admitted take an oath never to divulge." From the preceding pages it appears that the phrase "those admitted" appears to include women as well as men regarding the secret Masonic hand grips in the first three degrees. The Order of the Eastern Star (OES) is an international organization of women directed entirely by Freemasons. One or more Master Masons must preside at all meetings where degrees are conferred and at least two Master Masons must serve as OES officers. There are five OES degrees, Adah (the daughter), Ruth (the widow), Esther (the wife), Martha (the sister), Electa (the mother), and an honorary degree called the "Queen of 29 the South." These degrees are bestowed upon women who preform the Biblical and Cabalistically inspired OES ceremonies inside Masonic lodges. During these ceremonies women are taught secret oaths, passwords, signs, symbolisms, and a secret handgrip. Quoting from various Masonic sources, "The basic secrets of Freemasonry we do not seek to learn. We do not wish to make unreasonable demands upon our fathers, brothers, or husbands as Master Masons. Yet when we are told that we are intimately bound to the Masonic fraternity by ties most tender and lasting, we seek some tokens of recognition whereby we may know Masons and be known of them as sharing in the Masonic privileges."1 "Inviolably in my heart of hearts I will treasure what you have given me this hour, and this tongue shall be torn from its place before the least of your secrets shall be unlawfully made known."2 "Murder and treason are crimes and so the candidate agrees to conceal crimes of a lesser nature than murder and treason when committed by a brother Master Mason. The Eastern Star Queen of the South agrees that her 'tongue shall be torn from its place,' before the least of any Master Mason's secrets be unlawfully revealed by her, to the proper authorities or to a non-Mason, even though such non-Mason be her own husband . .. Nor dare the 'sister' complain when 'brother' husband goes on the primrose path, for should he be expelled from the lodge, she goes out to, unless she could induce some other brother to become her sponsor. A most ingenious way to make these women keep their mouths shut!"3 The Eastern Star uses a secret code to conceal its passwords, rituals, and signs. This code is a compilation of figures and letters in one book which can then be deciphered by using another "spelling book" in which every word in the ritual is to be found. Freemasonry believes that this ritual cipher is as secret as any cipher can be which is to be widely used. For example the ritual for Electa, the fifth degree of the Eastern Star is encoded this way: 7T 20s 3o 6E 8i 3m 28b 23c 7t 26a 7u 7t 24b, 7t 51 25a 5o 7t 10o, 7t 15p 3o 7t 13f 11r 7u 7t 18s; 6s, 32t 7t 18e 8u. 7T 3p 8i "11L 6o 19a. Which deciphered means: The sign of Electa is made by crossing the arms under the bosom, the left arm on the other, the position of the fingers right under the shoulders; slowly, turn the eyes upward. The pass is "Love one another." The ritual for Adah, the first degree is: 7T 20s 3o 1J 2D 8i 3m 28b 3t la 1v... which deciphered means: The sign of Japhthah's Daughter is made by taking a veil. .. and so on. The Ritual of the Order of the Eastern Star states, "The Ritual and Secret Work are copyrighted. The reproduction of all or any portion of the Ritual and Secret Work in any manner is positively prohibited. Officers and members under the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter are forbidden to copy any part of the Ritual or Secret Work for any purpose. Violations must be reported to the Most Worthy Grand Matron that she may force respect for our Ritual and rights, and enforce the penalty of forfeiture of membership and/or obtain redress under the copyright law."4 1Bell, F.A., Bell's Eastern Star Ritual, (P.R.C. Publications, Inc., 1988 revised edition), p.195-195; see also: Macoy, Robert (Arranged by), Adoptive Rite Ritual, (Virginia: Macoy Publishing and Masonic Supply Company, 1897), p.163-164. 2Macoy, op. cit., p. 165; see also: Meyer, William, The Order of the Eastern Star, p. 15 (no other information available). 3 Ibid., p. 15-16. 4 Ritual of the Order of the Eastern Star, published by authority of the General Grand Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, International Eastern Star Temple, 1618 New Hampshire Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C., 1956, p. 165. (This building was dedicated on February 24, 1937 as the headquarters for the 30 Immediately after a women is initiated into the Order of the Eastern Star the Masonic official in charge tells her, "In taking upon yourself the solemn Obligation of our Order, you enter upon a new phase of life; henceforth, you will be numbered among the members of this Order who have for their inspiration the Star of Bethlehem which will guide all the faithful to the New Jerusalem, that city not made with hands. I must remind you that with privileges come responsibilities. You have been informed that we are in possession of certain secrets by means of which we are able to make ourselves known to each other wherever we may meet. You have been conducted to the several points of the Star and have been instructed in the secret work of the Order which, if properly understood, will enable you to make yourself known as a member."5 After all of the secret passwords and signs have been memorized the initiates are assured that, "Any member of the Order is at liberty to give any one of these signs when she or he is among strangers and desires to become known to a Brother or a Sister. Any member seeing one of these signs given should respond by giving the Pass belonging to the Sign given and then, having withdrawn to a place of sufficient secrecy, should ask,. . ."6 (The book does not indicate what to ask). The real origin of the Eastern Star, like Freemasonry, has been purposely shrouded in secrecy. The Eastern Star as a rite seems to go back as early as 1730 however most Masonic sources give the founding of the "Order" of the Eastern Star as 1850. After a women is initiated into the Eastern Star she is eligible to join other Masonically-affiliated organizations like the Order of the Amaranth and the Order of the White Shrine of Jerusalem. The Eastern Star is in many ways even more secretive than the Masonic Order because little has been written about its "secrets." It reminds me of a tribe of men protecting their women folk. Then there are the youth groups such as the Rainbow Girls, Job's Daughters, and the DeMolays which are considered to be "feeder groups." The adolescents in these societies are groomed for potential membership in Masonry and the Eastern Star when they reach adulthood. According to a Masonic journal The New Age we are told that about 50% of DeMolays join Masonry when they reach 21 years of age. The August 1991 issue of The Scottish Rite Journal writes, "DeMolays reach the age of membership at 21. This is not a coincidence; it was intended to provide them with a goal—to be a Mason . . . Masonry is the only organization in the world that has its own ready-made membership resources. We have only to bring these youths into our Lodges, Eastern Star Chapters, or other Masonic organizations."7 Speculation: I believe from all of the preceding evidence and information that the secret handgrip of the International Order of the Eastern Star as mentioned in their Ritual of the Order of the Eastern Star is the Fellow Craft (Fellowship) handgrip of the 2nd degree of Freemasonry (the pressing of the thumb over the knuckle of the other person's middle finger). History: The origins of Freemasonry predate the American Revolutionary War. In the 16th century, during the Renaissance in western and northern Europe, the British Empire in its quest for world power needed covert intelligence gathering agencies with effective access to the people of Europe. Masonic lodges, which were International Order of the Eastern Star. This book does not disclose nor even mention the Eastern Star ritual ciphers.—ed.) 5 Ibid., p. 80-81. 6 Ibid., p. 82-83. 7Zeb E. Blanton, Jr., "Masonic Youth Have We Forgotten," The Scottish Rite Journal (August 1991; Vol. 99, No. 8), p. 20. 31 primarily Catholic institutions for building cathedrals, schools, and other structures, were widely in use across Europe during the Middle Ages. The British secret intelligence services, working as arms of the British landed nobility, the British intelligentsia, and after 1694 the Bank of England, began to purge Masonry of Catholic, Christian spiritual influences. Covert intelligence gathering was hidden from regular member Masons behind stories of Jewish antiquities, Christian knight-errantries, and the "occult" cover of many degrees of mysterious initiations. While today's masonically allied "Shriners," established in the United States in 1872, burlesque the Islamic religion, and the mysteries of Arabia, Egypt, and the Middle East. During the 18th century, Freemasonry was always "patriotic" in Great Britain, but in America and France Masonry was a primary, revolutionary force. Britain's insufficient resistance to the American Revolution allowed "New Age (Novus Ordo Seclorum)" deists, freemasons, and freethinkers to install a Masonic republic in North America. For more than three centuries Freemasonry has taught, behind the veils of Masonic Temple pageantries and secret binding oaths, that life is a search for "Light," and that Masonry knows the secret to reach this great "Light" of spiritual illumination. Freemasons have historically call themselves "Sons of Light" and "Citizens of the World" while the profane masses who have not received this secret instruction about "enlightened self awareness" are said to be in spiritual darkness. In this 20th century, Masonic teachings have come out of the lodges and have been made increasingly available to the public. Today, the public school systems of America teach the once secret Masonic doctrine of "total materialism of conscience, education, and state authority" to children. Freemasonry is an unofficial branch of the governments of Great Britain and the United States, and these governments see to it that Freemasonry is not examined in government subsidized public schools. After men and sometimes women show that they can keep the benign secrets of Masonic ceremonies, handgrips, passwords, and signs they become prime candidates for key positions in government and private industry. Freemasonry concerns itself with Egyptian mysticism, Solomon's Temple, the symbolic working tools of stone masonry, and the occult "Cabala," i.e., medieval literature that interprets the Scriptures to find "hidden meanings" about life. Freemasons represent, symbolically, the ruling class of ancient Egypt that designed and built the Great Pyramids for the puppet-king Pharaohs. During the fall of Egyptian civilization this hereditary priesthood fled northeast and continued its rule in the land of Canaan where they designed and built Solomon's Temple. Throughout the Dark and Middle Ages the priesthood survived in the rivaled hierarchies of Roman Catholicism, Talmudic Judaism, esoteric Islam, the Royal Dynasties of England and Europe, and the Houses that control national and international finance. For centuries Freemasonry has been a social club, a school for secrecy, a nursery that teaches nature worship, and a recruiting depot for political networks and intelligence agencies. Also, the Masonic rituals of the Blue Lodge (the initiatory three degrees of Freemasonry), the Scottish Rite (up to the thirty-second degree), and the York Rite (the so-called Christian "Knights Templars" degrees) are an indoctrinating force that inculcates, within the Freemason, a sympathy toward Biblical Israel and Zionism. And the masonically associated "Shriners" do the same with Islam. Freemasonry functions as a humanitarian cloak behind which the one-world architects of the secular Novus Ordo Seclorum, today's New World Order, can network together to build a "New Age" Solomon's Temple for international bankers, transnational corporations, and big business elites. All with the aid of mass media propagandists to amass the riches of the world atop a worldwide pyramid of universal monetized-debt feudalism whose paradigm is ancient Egypt. The real historical root of Freemasonry lies in the occult philosophy behind the Protestant Reformation of the Renaissance. During the Middle Ages an attempt to merge Cabalism with Roman Catholicism under the guise of "Christian occultism" by the Knights of the Temple of Solomon, i.e., Knights Templars, was partially stopped by the Christian Church at the Council of Vienne in the 14th century. Later, there arose during the "enlightenment" of the Renaissance an anti-Christ brotherhood of secret society adepts, who had been initiated into paganism and Cabalistic magic. The marriage between pagan sorcery, as represented by Hermetic Egyptian traditions, and the Cabala, as represented by Jewish traditions, was the occult philosophy of the Protestant Reformation. Catholic and non-Catholic secret societies began infiltrating this occult philosophy into Christian elite circles using the 32 "black magic" handbook called the Cabala. "Christian" Cabalists began popularizing the idea that the Cabala unveiled a "secret code" within the Bible revealing "hidden meanings." Cabalists fomented the rise of a Catholic clergy dissatisfied with official Church interpretation of the Bible. The Protestant Reformation in Elizabethan England was a cover for a renaissance of anti-Christian "New Age" occultism revolving around the eternal pagan psychodrama of sex, death, and nature worship that finally resulted in Freemasonry—the universal altruistic screen behind which subsequent secret societies have operated clandestinely. The American "Republic for which it stands, one nation . . .," like the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and the other national republics around the world are but stepping stones for a Masonic "One World Government" republic where the earth's populace will be a layered pyramid of economic classes ruled over by an "illuminated" class of anti-Christ dynastic elites. Meanwhile, down at the lodge level, Freemasonry is good fun. People meet lots of people they would never otherwise meet, and good conversation is enjoyed over a good meal, whereas the rituals done in the Masonic lodges across America are mostly amateur theatrics. More importantly Freemasonry is a mechanism of social control, a feudal pyramid, where people of influence and wealth can mix with ordinary folks. In this manner "New Age" Freemasons can filter their ethical, moral, and political values down through the social structure of society. One of the first things taught in Freemasonry is obeying rank. The ritual tells how the workmen building Solomon's Temple were split into small lodges in a way "best calculated to ensure promotion to merit, preserve due subordination and prevent confusion in the work." Forget merit, Freemasonry is all about due subordination to a Masonic hierarchy of rank and fortune. While Freemasons can make themselves known to each other with secret handshakes and signs, Freemasons can also make themselves known to each other simply by using a form of words that only a Mason could know, because Masons recite them often in their lodge ritual. Further Speculation: As distasteful as this may be to some people, it is possible that today's universal finger sign of contempt, extending the middle finger from the clenched fist, has a Masonic connection. Freemasonry historically comes clothed in layers of sexual symbolism, e.g., the ceremony of quickly raising the initiate to an erect standing position from lying prone on the lodge floor, the compasses as the symbolic dominate male standing over the square as the symbolic submissive female, the phallic vertical columns that guard the entrance to the lodge, the point within a circle representing sexual union, the reproductive symbolism of the Pythagorean theorem (the sexual union of the male and female that produces offspring), obelisks as phallic grave markers and monuments, the Rose Croix degree (the Rose as a symbol of the blooming of the genital organs of women), the sun representing the male and the moon representing the female, Masonic contempt for the uninitiated profane who have not been raised in the lodge. And, as seen in the preceding films, the Fellow Craft and Master Mason's hand grips are fixated with the knuckle of the most phallic finger of the hand, the middle finger. Conclusion: Some scientists believe that the reason modern man "shakes hands" is that a very long time ago as primitive men approached each other in the wilderness they presented their open hands as a gesture of friendship to show they held no weapons. Freemasonry as the Big Daddy, great-great. . . Grandfather of today's American, British, and other secret intelligence services, on the other hand, has always used secrecy as a weapon against the uninitiated. The modern technology of "freezing" the VHS film frame using the pause button on a VCR can strip away some of the secrecy of Masonic handshakes and the anonymity of those who used them. Whether most of the aforementioned Masonic hand grips were intentional, which I believe they were, or some of them unintentional, or some just plain accidental it looks to me like there has been a lot of Masonic handshaking going on in front of the blinking and twinkling of our eyes. Dean Grace, September, 1998. 33 P.S. After the short preliminary, and somewhat flawed, monogram about Masonic handshakes that came out in 1994 entitled "A Guide to Masonic 'Handshakes' in the Movies: 53 Films Analyzed," and subsequently since this new fleshed-out manuscript came out in 1998; the London to New York to Hollywood motion picture axis has started mentioning "secret handshakes" in a casual oflhand way in some of their new movies. This is part of the mechanism of mind control for the uninitiated movie viewing masses—to put "secret handshakes" on the same mind numbing, irreverent level as advertisements, profanity, sex, and violence for those who have little knowledge about the Masonic oriented cryptocracy that influences their lives. Also as a side bar, I have witnessed both men and women using master mason "secret handshakes" on television game shows. The New World Order, a world federation of nations run by international and national central bankers, big business elites, transnational corporations, and mass media propagandists will use any means necessary, even a police state, to secure the earth for their future scions and protegee. We must resist—it is our God given nature. Dean Grace. April, 2001. Movies Without Masonic "Handshakes" A Clockwork Orange A Cry in the Dark A Patch of Blue A Streetcar Named Desire Abbott & Costello in Hollywood Abbott & Costello meet Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde African Queen Air America Airplane I & II Algiers Alien Aliens All Quiet on the Western Front An Officer and a Gentleman Anatomy of a Murder Angels in the Outfield Apocalypse Now Around the World in 80 Days Author! Author! Batman Beetlejuice Beverly Hills Cop Blade Runner Bonnie and Clyde Broken Blossoms Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid Cacoon Caine Mutiny Cape Fear II Captain Blood Captain Ron Captains Courageous Carnival of Souls Casablanca Cat Ballou Cat on a Hot Tin Roof Chariots of Fire Charlie Chan in the Secret Service Children of a Lesser god Children of the Damned Citizen Kane City Slickers Class Action Clean and Sober Cleopatra Cliffhanger Come Back, Little Sheba Coming Home Creature from the Black Lagoon Dances with Wolves Dead Poets Society Deliverance Demolition Man Destination Moon Dr. Strangelove E.T. East of Eden Easy Rider Ed Wood—Look Back in Angora Elmer Gantry Elvira Madigan Elvis: The Echo Will Never Die Every Which Way But Loose Fantastic Voyage Farewell to Arms Five Easy Pieces Forbidden Planet Frankenstein Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man Freemasonry: From Darkness to Light? From Here to Eternity Gandhi Gentlemen Prefer Blondes Ghostbusters II Goldfinger Good Morning Vietnam Goodbye Columbus Goodbye Mr. Chips Grand Hotel Gunga Din Happy Birthday, Bugs: 50 Looney Years Harvey High Noon Hollywood Scandals & Tragedies Home Alone Honey, I Shrunk the Kids How Green Was My Valley Hud I'm dancing as fast as I can Indiana Jones & the Temple of Doom Inherit the Wind Inside the Brotherhood In the Heat of the Night Invasion of the Body Snatchers I & II It Conquered the World It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World Ivanhoe Jailhouse Rock Jaws 34 JFK: The Day the Nation Cried Journey to the Center of the Earth Judgment at Nuremberg Key Largo Klute Kriemhilde's Revenge L.A. Confidential Last Tango in Paris Laura Lawrence of Arabia Let It Ride Look Back in Anger Marjorie Morningstar Marty Memphis Belle Miami Blues Miracle on 34th St. Misery Missing Mr. Smith Goes to Washington My Darling Clementine My Little Chickadee Oklahoma! On the Beach One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest Paint Your Wagon Paper Moon Plan 9 from Outer Space Planet of the Apes Platoon Predator Psycho Q&A Raiders of the Lost Ark Rain Rain Man Rear Window Repo Man Revenge of the Nerd Rio Lobo Road to Morocco Road to Singapore Rocketship X-M Roe Vs. Wade Rosemary's Baby Sabrina Sadat, Louis Gossett Jr. as Silver Streak Singin' in the Rain Some Like It Hot Sometimes a Great Notion South Pacific Soylent Green Star Trek the Motion Picture Stay Tuned Superman Sweet Bird of Youth Target Terminator I & II The Andromeda Strain The Bedford incident The Best Years of Our Lives The Big Chill The Big Sleep The Big Trail The Birds II: Land's End The Cincinnati Kid The Color of Money The Dirty Dozen The Enemy Below The Fisher King The French Connection I & II The Fugitive The Gods Must Be Cra2y II The Good the Bad and the Ugly The Graduate The Great Dictator The Hunchback of Notre Dame The Inspector General The Killing of President Kennedy The King and I The Life of Emile Zola The Lost Boys The Lost Weekend The Naked Gun The Night of the Iguana The Nutty Professor The Panama Deception The Paper Chase The Pawnbroker The Private Lives of Elizabeth & Essex The Real Malcolm X The Red Shoes The Return of the Pink Panther The Right Stuff The Road Warrior The Sand Pebbles The Shining The Silence of the Lambs The Sound of Music The Sting The Thing I & II The Three Faces of Eve The Trip to Bountiful The Wicker Man The Wild Bunch The Wizard of Oz I Thelma & Louise They Live Things to Come Three Days of the Condor Throw Momma from the Train Time Machine Tom Jones Top Gun 35 Tortilla Flat True Grit Twilight Zone--the Movie Valley of the Dolls Vertigo Videodrome Von Ryan's Express Waiting for the Light Wargames War of the Worlds Watergate—The Secret Story Wayne's World When Worlds Collide White Heat Who Didn't Kill... JFK Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolf Working Girl You'll Never Get Rich Young Frankenstein Zulu