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The Cross NOT

Cross

The crucifiction device used by the Romans was a "stauros."  A stauros was a mere large tall stake.  It was used to execute criminals and other unwanted people.  It used in various methods.  

It was sometimes was pointed used by thrusting it through a persons body and thus pinning him to the earth to die painfully for everyone to see.  Sometimes they would put the person at the top with the point at the stomach, and as time went on the point would pierce the stomach and eventually kill the person.  

The most common was just to tie the hands up at the top of the stauros and let the person die of exposure and dehydration.  There is no accounts of people being nailed to the stake.

There is no evidence whatsoever that a cross or even a T shape was used.  There is no depiction of a cross until the 5th century.  The first common usage of a crucifix was in the 7th century.  Before that time Jesus was always depicted as a fish, or as a shephard ... and never on a cross.

Stauros

The Stauros

The Imperial Bible-Dictionary acknowledges this, saying: “The Greek word for cross, [stau‧ros′], properly signified a stake, an upright pole, or piece of paling, on which anything might be hung, or which might be used in impaling [fencing in] a piece of ground. . . . Even amongst the Romans the crux (from which our word cross is derived) appears to have been originally an upright pole.”

Acts 5:30 and 10:39 as examples of the correct translations.

 The God of our fathers raised up Jesus, whom ye slew and hanged on a tree.    Acts 5:30

39 And we are witnesses of all things which he did both in the land of the Jews, and in Jerusalem; whom they slew and hanged on a tree:     Acts 10:39

In those verses KJ, RS, JB, and Dy translate xy′lon as “tree,”  A Greek-English Lexicon, by Liddell and Scott (Oxford, 1968, pp. 1191, 1192).

Before Jesus, the Greek Bacchus, the Tyrian Tammuz, the Chaldean Bel, and the Norse Odin, were all symbolised to their votaries by a cruciform device.”—The Cross in Ritual, Architecture, and Art (London, 1900), G. S. Tyack, p. 1.  In ancient Israel, unfaithful Jews wept over the death of the false god Tammuz. Jehovah spoke of what they were doing as being a ‘detestable thing.’ (Ezek. 8:13, 14) According to history, Tammuz was a Babylonian god, and the cross was used as his symbol. 

“The shape of the [two-beamed cross] had its origin in ancient Chaldea, and was used as the symbol of the god Tammuz (being in the shape of the mystic Tau, the initial of his name) in that country and in adjacent lands, including Egypt. By the middle of the 3rd cent. A.D. the churches had either departed from, or had travestied, certain doctrines of the Christian faith. In order to increase the prestige of the apostate ecclesiastical system pagans were received into the churches apart from regeneration by faith, and were permitted largely to retain their pagan signs and symbols. Hence the Tau or T, in its most frequent form, with the cross-piece lowered, was adopted to stand for the cross of Christ.”—An Expository Dictionary of New Testament Words (London, 1962), W. E. Vine, p. 256. Additional Reading: http://www2.mf.no/bibel/vines.html

“Various objects, dating from periods long anterior to the Christian era, have been found, marked with crosses of different designs, in almost every part of the old world. India, Syria, Persia and Egypt have all yielded numberless examples . . . The use of the cross as a religious symbol in pre-Christian times and among non-Christian peoples may probably be regarded as almost universal, and in very many cases it was connected with some form of nature worship.”—Encyclopædia Britannica (1946), Vol. 6, p. 753.

Just taking the Christian Story as it is depicted by Christians, what type of person would feel they want to remember a torchure of one of their dearest friends who was executed on the basis of false charges?  What kind of person would make a replica of the instrument of execution?

The Christian Bible many times mentiones  "cross" or "crucify" and is futhering a myth and worshiping the false god Tannuz.  Anyone depicting a cross as a symbol of a crucifiction is advertising a pagan religion.